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VCU Magazine 

A publication for the alumni and friends of 
Virginia Commonwealth University 



Volume 11, Number 2 
Summer 1982 



2 Inside China 



Difficulties experienced by Chinese urban planners 
were the focus of a visit to China by a United States del- 
egation headed by the chairman of the university's De- 
partment of Urban Studies and Planning. 

7 Fashion's Finest 

Contemporary, avant-garde garments designed and 
constructed by university students were showcased re- 
cently in the Department of Fashion's annual fashion 
show. 

10 Alzheimer's Disease 

Coping with victims of Alzheimer's disease, a slow, de- 
bilitating degeneration of the brain cells, is an often un- 
bearable ordeal. The university's gerontology program 
has initiated a support group designed to help family 
members deal more effectively with Alzheimer's pa- 
tients and manage their own anxieties and frustrations. 

14 Student Attitudes 

Nearly a decade of student opinion has been analyzed 
in a study carried out by the university's Department of 
Psychology which indicates significant changes in atti- 
tudes about life and work. 

19 University News 
25 Newsmakers 
27 Alumni Update 




Cover: Garment designed (n/ Pnuin Howard and 
illustrated by Steve Huott 



Each issue of VCU Magazine details only a tew of ttie interesting aspects of Virginia 
Commonwealth University. The opinions expressed in VCU Magazine are those of the 
author and are not necessarily those of VCU. 

Located in Virginia's capital city, Richmond, VCU is composed of two campuses — 
the Medical College of Virginia Campus and the Academic Campus. VCU traces its 
founding date to 1838, the year in which MCV was created as a department of Hamp- 
den-Sydney College. The Academic Campus is the former Richmond Professional In- 
stitute which was begun in 1917. VCU is the third largest state-aided university in 
Virginia and enrolls over 20,000 students. 

VCU Magazine is produced quarterly by the Office of University Publications. 

Copyright © 1982 by Virginia Commonwealth University 

Ed Kanis, editor 

Greta Matus, designer 

David Mathis, director of university publications 

I VCU PUBLICATIONS I 



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Inside China 



A veil professor investigates urban planning issues 



Allen Fonoroff, chairman of the 
Department of Urban Studies and 
Planning, recently led a team of 
15 U.S. city planners to China. 
Sponsored by the U.S. China 
People's Friendship Association, 
the trip was organized following a 
request from the Chinese for an 
exchange of information with 
American city planning profes- 
sionals. During a three-week stay 
that included stops in Shanghai, 
Hangzhou, Nanjing, Zhengzhou, 
Loyang, and Beijing, the team 
investigated problems encoun- 
tered by Chinese city planners 
and conducted seminars address- 
ing Chinese planning issues. 



By Allen Fonoroff 

Modern technology 
whisked us halfway 
around the world at high 
speed to witness the surprise of 
an antiquated farming technique 
in a nation with nuclear capacity. 
As our plane swept over the East 
China Sea our sleepy eyes wid- 
ened as the Chinese shoreline 
came into view. Below we saw 
the Yangtze River flowing into the 
sea, small villages, cultivated 
fields, and rice paddies. Sud- 
denly, we were landing at the 
Shanghai airport. As the plane 
taxied to the terminal we passed 
our surprise: a group of peasants 
had spread part of their wheat 
harvest on the side of the runway 
to dry. 



Recounting impressions of the 
People's Republic of China is a 
difficult task. It is essential to 
avoid the temptation of instant 
expertise and illogical compari- 
sons between China, a develop- 
ing country, and the United 
States. A more reasonable ap- 
proach is to accept Chinese values 
as the criteria for determining 
their planning goals and objec- 
tives. What follows is based on 
three weeks spent immersed in 
Chinese city planning problems. 

Cultural differences between 
Chinese and American societies 
influence our understanding of 
Chinese values and priorities. 
What is intolerable for Americans 
may be preferable to the Chinese. 

For example, individual free- 
dom, and the inalienable right to 
implement it within broad public 
policies, is a cherished and pro- 
tected American value. The cul- 
tural heritage of the Chinese, 
however, does not place the same 
priority on maximizing individual 
opportunities or providing 
choices for individual action. 
Their emphasis seems to be on 
meeting societal goals, and indi- 
vidual actions are directed toward 
that end. However, there appears 
to be a stronger feeling among 
urban Chinese for greater free- 
dom to participate in the decision- 
making process. Knowledge of 
these differences is crucial to 
understanding Chinese society 
and the rationale used in defining 
goals and objectives, which are 
fixed by a central hierarchy that 



allows little, if any, room for 
differences of opinion. 

Another important factor to 
consider is the destruction of 
higher education and the denigra- 
tion of professionalism that oc- 
curred during the country's cul- 
tural revolution. In an ill-designed 
effort to make the elite more 
conscious of the revolution, uni- 
versities were closed and students 
and professors were sent to work 
in the fields and factories. The 
universities are now-operating 
with expanded facilities, a grow- 
ing student body, and more 
faculty. 

In the universities, education in 
city planning emphasizes design 
and architectural engineering 
skills. Soviet architectural plan- 
ning techniques are being re- 
placed by West German influ- 
ences. The curriculum does not 
yet include a social science per- 
spective for making land use 
decisions. 

A number of basic factors must 
be considered by Chinese city 
planners: immobility of the popu- 
lation; birth control; the afore- 
mentioned devastation of profes- 
sionals and higher education that 
occurred during the cultural 



Right: Most of the newer housing 
in China is similar to these ma- 
sonry walk-ups in Beijing. Small 
by U.S. standards, the units 
include individual kitchens and 
lavatories. 




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revolution; a policy of self-suffi- 
ciency for each city or region; 
public ownership of land and the 
means of production and distribu- 
tion; and increased industrializa- 
tion, economic development, and 
transportation. 

In China, city planning is un- 
characteristically decentralized. 
National objectives and general 
guidelines are followed closely by 
each city planning bureau. How- 
ever, each municipality is respon- 
sible for preparing a master plan 
as well as other detailed local 
planning projects. These local 
plans are subjected to very cur- 
sory national review. 

Although cities are free to plan, 
there appears to be a certain 
standardization in planning 
which allows little room for inno- 
vation. The national government, 
through the National Bureau of 
Urban Construction, has es- 
tablished policies on future urban- 
ization which limit the size of 
cities and encourage the develop- 
ment of satellite cities. These 
policies do not recognize historic, 
cultural, or environmental differ- 
ences between cities and are 
followed without exception. 

Municipal planning bureaus 
must compete with other city 
agencies, communes, and state- 
owned enterprises in making land 
use decisions. Where objectives 
differ, competition becomes 
heated. The conflict between 
unbridled economic growth and 
environmental protection in 
China is not unlike the battles 
between public agencies and 
private enterprise in the United 
States. 

As previously stated, popula- 
tion immobility is a major factor 
affecting city planning. In China 
everyone either belongs to a 
functional unit or becomes a 
nonperson and is denied society's 
benefits. Such units may include a 
factory, an agricultural brigade, a 
neighborhood, or housing area. 
This situation is basic to economic 
and physical planning and the 
distribution of housing and social 
services. Without permission 
from the unit, people are immo- 
bile. They cannot change jobs. 




One- and two-story courtyard houses, like these in Nanjing, comprise 
most of the older housing in China. 



move from one dwelling to an- 
other, or from one city to another. 
Such control over population 
mobility makes it easier to answer 
questions about the location and 
number of dwellings. However, it 
does not necessarily lead to the 
best or most desirable solutions. 

To ease population pressures in 
the cities and to encourage indus- 
trialization, the Chinese have 
developed satellite cities. Persons 
living in satellite cities spend most 
of their time at home since the 
distance between a satellite and 
its central city makes commuting 
difficult. 

Another factor affecting city 
planning is birth control, cur- 
rently a high priority in China. 
Couples are encouraged to delay 
marriage and to have only one 
child. If they do so, the couple 
receives a subsidy. Should a 
second child be born, the couple 
may be required to return the 
subsidy and the youngster may 
be denied social services. Enforce- 



ment of these sanctions varies 
from city to city. 

Industrial development in 
satellite cities is a major objective 
of Chinese city planning. Indus- 
trial development means modern- 
ization, and modernization of the 
economy is the theme and catch- 
word. The physical shape of 
future facilities will be fixed by 
the implementation of this theme. 

As industry expands so does 
environmental pollution. An area 
downwind and/or downstream 
from large population centers is a 
major criterion affecting the loca- 
tion of an industry. Although 
there is serious concern about 
environmental problems, indus- 
trial development remains first 
priority. Such conflict is not unfa- 
miliar to American planners. 

Faced with an undeveloped 
transportation system, agri- 
cultural self-sufficiency is another 
major planning objective. Feeding 
a population of nearly 1 billion 



persons is no small task. Agri- 
cultural communes located on the 
periphery of cities supply neigh- 
boring metropolitan areas with 
approximately 90 percent of their 
food supply. The populace eats 
only food that is in season. Com- 
munes are organized into bri- 
gades, each consisting of 100 to 
200 families. Those we visited 
were relatively prosperous and 
used a portion of their profits to 
construct housing, build a small 
food processing plant, or provide 
social services. 

This interdependence of agri- 
culture and industry fulfills an- 
other social goal: the integration 
of urban and rural values with a 
social parity of city and country. 
However, there is a vast hinter- 
land beyond the communes not 
closely associated with the popu- 
lation centers where distinct 
underdeveloped parts of Chinese 
society remain. 

In the cities housing is a severe 
problem. Housing is in very short 
supply and the demand for it has 
increased considerably with the 
influx of millions who were sent 
to the country during the cultural 
revolution. China's older housing 
is built in a traditional style and 
consists of one- and two-story 
courtyard houses. These build- 
ings have been augmented by 
squatters' dwellings, meticulously 
clean one-story masonry struc- 
tures located along the building 
lines of many streets and in open 
spaces within the cities. Because 
these dwellings are officially 
recognized, they are better built 
than typical squatters' housing. 

Newer housing consists primar- 
ily of five- and six-story masonry 
walk-ups. The units are relatively 
small by U.S. standards, averag- 
ing about 370 to 455 square feet. 
The newer units have individual 
kitchens and lavatories, and the 
buildings are utilitarian and inex- 
pensive. Rent averages about $5 
per month. The floor plans and 
the architecture are unimagina- 
tive, repetitious, and dull, but the 
visual impact of the barrack-like 
apartment structures is softened 
considerably by landscaping. 

Many tenants indicated they 
dislike climbing five and six 
flights of stairs and prefer low-rise 



buildings with easier access to the 
ground. For the overwhelming 
majority, however, the new hous- 
ing is better than that of the past. 
Perhaps aesthetic considerations 
will return as a traditional value 
when the effects of the cultural 
revolution subside. The Chinese 
have begun studying the concept 
of low-rise, high density residen- 
tial developments. 

Factories and agricultural com- 
munes have some control over 
the supply and location of hous- 
ing for their workers. Since part 
of the communes' profits from 
production is used to supply 
housing, the most productive can 
construct larger dwelling units 
and acquire land for expansion. 
Such expansion frequently results 
in competition and conflict be- 
tween industry and agriculture. 
These conflicts must be resolved 
at the national level. 

As for Chinese cities, they are 
quite crowded. Within the cities 
are beautiful large parks, but 
surprisingly limited amounts of 
smaller open spaces for leisure 
activities. Every sidewalk, alley, 
and yard is constantly busy with 
daily activities: exercising, so- 
cializing, playing cards, reading, 
doing laundry, and conducting 
business. While these sights are 
uncommon for tourists, the charm 



of a typical street scene reflects 
the Chinese way of life. In the 
early morning before the rush 
hour, streets are filled with people 
buying breakfast from vendors, 
beginning their daily shopping, 
cleaning the streets, washing the 
sidewalks, and doing t'ai chi 
exercises. 

An impressive feature of urban 
development is the ubiquitous 
street tree. The national govern- 
ment embarked on a major street 
tree planting project about 25 
years ago and lined the streets of 
most cities with sycamore trees. 
The trees are attractive and help 
soften the harsh visual impact of 
the new buildings. 

Massive projects such as plant- 
ing thousands of trees or digging 
canals can be accomplished easily 
in a short time because the gov- 
ernment can quickly mobilize 
thousands of workers. Labor 
intensive work is no problem in a 
country with almost one billion 
people and a large unemployment 
roll. 

Another factor which influences 
planning is transportation. There 
is no private ownership of auto- 
mobiles. Buses, trolley buses, 
trucks, manual and motor driven 
hand carts, and the ever-present 
bicycle provide the major means 
of urban transportation. 




Human power plays a key role in the transporting of supplies. Both men 
and women haul heavy loads in two-wheeled carts. 




Once ecologically dead. West Lake has been revived through the enforcement of strict pollution control 
measures. The lake is located in Hangzhou, one of China's six ancient cities. 



Mass transportation takes on a 
new dimension vs'ith so many 
vehicles and people on city streets 
and is often anarchic. Vehicles 
and bicycles spill out of their 
traffic lanes. Pedestrians are often 
in jeopardy as cyclists, with bells 
jangling, refuse to yield, and 
motor vehicles, with horns blar- 
ing, bear down on everyone in 
their way. The cacophony is both 
frightening and awesome. How- 
ever, traffic would probably come 
to a standstill if the horns and 
bells were silenced. 

Walking and cycling are the 
most common means of transpor- 
tation. In China there is one 
bicycle for every two people, 
which translates into 100,000 to 
200,000 bicycles on the streets 
during rush hour. Although some 
of the larger boulevards have 
bicycle lanes, traffic meets at the 
intersections and there the anar- 
chy is rampant. This chaos leads 
to a frightful number of accidents 
and many fatalities. 

Despite the large number of 
vehicles, traffic engineering is 
practically nonexistent. There are 
very few traffic lights, and those 
are generally ignored. But the 
traffic does move, and millions of 
people are able to get to work and 
to shopping and recreation areas. 
Transportation is aided by the 
efficient bus and trolley bus sys- 
tem which offers frequent and 



inexpensive service. The buses 
are always crowded and resemble 
rush hour in Tokyo or New York. 
Chinese hospitality, however, 
dictates that foreigners be offered 
seats. This courtesy does not 
apply to elderly Chinese or 
women. 

The movement of supplies 
within the cities is achieved 
mostly by truck and bicycle. 
There are a few animal drawn 
carts and many carts pulled by 
humans. Both men and women 
haul heavy loads in these two- 
wheeled carts. 

Chinese city planners are con- 
cerned with these transportation 
problems and are developing 
plans for circumferential high- 
ways to alleviate inner city con- 
gestion. Planners realize they 
must also influence national 
policy to control the number of 
automobiles manufactured, 
whether mopeds and motorized 
bicycles should be encouraged, 
and whether further street widen- 
ing will promote more conges- 
tion. 

Although much of China's 
cultural heritage has been pre- 
served, a large part has been 
destroyed. During the cultural 
revolution historic and scenic 
cities were desecrated; the old city 
wall in Beijing was destroyed to 
build a boulevard; polluting 
industries were constructed in 
Hangzhou on the banks of West 
Lake, a scenic show place for 



centuries; and ancient pagodas 
and other historic buildings were 
left to decay. However, this situa- 
tion has changed since Mao's 
death. There is now greater con- 
cern for historic and scenic preser- 
vation. Restoration, stimulated 
partly by a desire to attract tour- 
ists, is visible throughout the 
country. The continued preserva- 
tion of typical Chinese city life 
will require great restraint in 
rebuilding older parts of the 
cities. 

There is a sense of history in 
every Chinese city, a feeling of 
visiting one of civilization's birth- 
places. This nation is engaged in 
developing its potential. It must 
industrialize. It must develop its 
economy. It must provide for the 
basic needs of its people. The 
challenge is whether the Chinese 
can balance these imperatives 
without destroying a culture and 
heritage so important to the 
human race. C? 



Fashion's Finest 



Students display creative talents in annual show 



By Ed Kanis 

Never let it be said that 
VCU is not a trend setter, 
especially when it comes 
to fashion. 

Garments designed and con- 
structed by fashion students are 
testimony to the department's 
emphasis on innovation. In late 
April, students displayed their 
creations at the department's 
annual fashion show. 

"Many of the fashions are 
contemporary and avant-garde," 
said Theo Young, chairman of the 
Department of Fashion. "You 
won't see most of these styles 
being worn until next year." 

A great deal of effort is ex- 
pended in making the clothes. 
Not only must students have an 
eye for flair and creativity, they, 
like others in the fine arts, must 
pay attention to color, proportion, 
and balance. No matter what the 
amount of effort, students have 
no assurance their garments will 
be included in the show. Two 
weeks before the event a jury 
composed of area merchants and 
fashion professionals makes the 
actual selection of clothes to be 
featured. This year, over 120 
garments were reviewed before 
the actual 80 to be modeled were 
selected. 

All categories of apparel were 
featured in this year's event, 
including children's wear, men's 
and ladies' wear, sportswear. 



swimsuits, loungewear, tailored 
outfits, and ballgowns. Among 
the fashions were a white street- 
length coat with a shoulder-to- 
hem ruffle; a hand crocheted 
short coat in bands of five colors; 
a slight pink blouse and pants 
with dozens of tiny tucks; silk 
pajama outfits; full-blown knick- 
ers with velvet jackets; and pan- 
eled challis skirts. 

Young indicated the fashion 
show combines the talents of the 
entire department, including 
fashion design, fashion illustra- 
tion, and fashion merchandising 
majors. Preparation for the event, 
which takes about one year, 
begins with fashion design stu- 
dents submitting 20 drawings of 
designs they wish to execute for 
possible inclusion in the show. 
Classroom critiques follow, which 
eliminate all but six drawings per 
student. These ideas are then 
submitted to professional fashion 
designers in New York and Phila- 
delphia who work with students 
to complete one garment design 
for the show. 

Illustration students provide a 
variety of fashion illustrations 
used in staging the show as well 
as illustrations of completed 
pieces. Merchandising majors 
provide commentary while 
clothes are being modeled and 
during the garment sale which 
follows the show. This year, they 
are also involved in efforts to 
market the clothes to area retailers 
and manufacturers on a large 
scale basis. 



According to Young the gar- 
ment sale helps students recoup 
some of the funds expended in 
preparing the clothes. Students 
must bear most of the cost of 
fabric and materials for the gar- 
ments, some of which cost over 
$500 to make. Young indicated 
efforts are being made to solicit 
donations of fabric from area 
merchants to help offset these 
costs. 

Such efforts are indicative of 
the attempts bv Young and other 
faculty members to make the 
show a community event. Cur- 
rently its audience is composed 
primarily of parents, alumni, and 
selected merchants and fashion 
enthusiasts. 

Young noted the guidance and 
expertise provided by New York 
and Philadelphia professionals is 
an integral part of the show. Not 
only do they work with students 
in all phases of garment design 
and construction, they also assist 
with preparation of models, 
choreography, cosmetics, and 
hairdressing. "It's a truly profes- 
sional production," said Young. 

While the annual event offers 
students a chance to showcase 
their talents, it also serves as a 
practical exercise in putting to- 
gether a major production. 
"When fashion students leave 
VCU they have to know how to 
put on a fashion show," said 
Young. "This certainly gives them 
the experience. It is a true learn- 
ing opportunity." 




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10 



Alzheimer's 
Disease 



Helping families cope with a neurological nightmare 



By Laurel Bennett 

Henry Fonda, portraying an 
80-year old man in the re- 
cent film "On Golden 
Pond," goes out to pick berries, 
loses his way, and forgets how to 
get home. Martha Blake, 72, of 
Knoxville, Tennessee, sits all day 
staring out of a window and 
speaks to no one. Peter Harrow, 
58, of Portland, once a highly-re- 
garded engineer, can no longer 
remember his name or the names 
of anyone in his family. 

One of these people has mild 
and occasional forgetfulness that 
sometimes occurs during normal 
aging. One is depressed, a fairly 
common phenomenon in elderly 
individuals facing a variety of 
stressful situations. A third has 
Alzheimer's disease, an irrevers- 
ible, progressive degeneration of 
the brain cells which leads to a 
decline in psychological and cog- 
nitive abilities. 

In most cases there is little need 
to pay undue attention to occa- 
sional forgetfulness, while the 
worst effects of depression can of- 
ten be treated. But for individuals 
afflicted with Alzheimer's disease, 
there is no treatment or cure. 

Diagnosing Alzheimer's disease 
is difficult. Its initial symptoms 



are vague, nonspecific, and easily 
confused with those of other dis- 
orders. Consequently, it can often 
take up to two years of medical 
tests to rule out all other possibili- 
ties. 

Originally believed to afflict pri- 
marily people under 65, Al- 
zheimer's disease is now recog- 
nized as the most common cause 
of senility in persons over that 
age. Today, approximately 50 per- 
cent of elderly men and women in 
the United States with severe in- 
tellectual impairment are victims 
of Alzheimer's disease or related 
illnesses. Estimates indicate 1 to 
1.5 million Americans are afflicted 
with Alzheimer's. As the number 
of elderly persons increases, some 
experts say that by 1990 it may 
cost as much as $30 billion each 
year to institutionalize and care 
for people who will suffer from 
this disease. 

Confined to the brain, the pro- 
gress of the disease is different for 
each person. At first only the in- 
dividual with the illness experi- 
ences the imperceptible symp- 
toms — a forgotten name or 
difficulty in concentration. Gradu- 
ally, however, families, friends, 
and employers become aware of 
abnormal behavior patterns in- 
cluding increased memory loss, 
confusion, and the inability of the 
afflicted person to perform or 



complete simple tasks. 

These inexplicable changes in 
essential functions are a source of 
deep frustration for the victim of 
the disease. As the disease pro- 
gresses, it also creates an almost 
unendurable ordeal for family 
members. "When 1 first began my 
research on the disease 1 had no 
idea of the degree of suffering 
these families went through," said 
Dr. Stephen Harkins, associate 
professor of gerontology, psychia- 
try, and psychology. 

Harkins' initial contact with 
families of Alzheimer's sufferers 
began purely by chance while he 
was researching an early diagnos- 
tic procedure for the disease in 
1975 in Seattle, Washington. Fam- 
ily members in the area who were 
referred to him would come to his 
laboratory to obtain information 
about the illness. 

"1 was struck by the fact that 
during the time they were waiting 
for a confirmation they went 
through chronic crises that contin- 
ued even after the symptoms had 
been identified," Harkins recalled. 

Harkins explained that in 1975 
there was a minimal amount of 
information available about Al- 
zheimer's. Though as early as 
1906 the neurological cell changes 
in presenile patients had been de- 



ll 



scribed by Alois Alzheimer, a Ger- 
man physician, this discovery was 
at first ignored. At that time doc- 
tors were more concerned with 
psychoanalytical causes of behav- 
ioral abnormalities. Consequent- 
ly, people were being treated for 
insanity when, in fact, they had 
Alzheimer's disease. 

It was not until the early 1960s 
that medical research allowed 
doctors to fit together the various 
pieces of this particular neurologi- 
cal puzzle and identify Al- 
zheimer's as a unique disease sep- 
arate from arteriosclerosis or 
chronic brain syndrome, blanket 
diagnoses often used to describe 
dementing Ulnesses of unknown 
origin. 

"While talking with families we 
would describe to them what we 
had seen in other patients, what 
symptoms had been reported to 
us, and how other families were 
coping," said Harkins. "We often 
ended up by suggesting that they 
get in touch with other people 
who shared similar problems." 

The families were so impressed 
with the positive results of the re- 
ferral process that soon a small 
support group was formed. As 
the group grew and solidified, it 
allied itself with five other similar 
groups around the country that 
had begun to emerge at about the 
same time. The regional groups 
eventually formed a national or- 
ganization called the Association 
for Alzheimer's and Related Dis- 
eases (AARD). Today, it is a 
highly organized network of local 
groups which work closely to- 
gether to promote awareness, 
support, and research. 

Harkins, who came to VCU in 
1979, said he was attracted to the 
university's gerontology program 
because it would allow him to 
continue his research on Al- 
zheimer's disease. It also enabled 
him to teach students to work 
with the elderly. 

Soon after arriving at the uni- 
versity Harkins attempted to de- 
velop a research project that 
would lead to a method for mak- 
ing an early diagnosis. He had 
hoped to set up a data bank of 



symptoms and physical character- 
istics of the disease based on neu- 
rological, genetic, blood, and psy- 
chological tests. However, be- 
cause of the difficulty in early di- 
agnosis of the disease and the 
need to organize a large number 
of doctors and technicians work- 
ing exclusively on the project, this 
approach proved infeasible. 

"If we couldn't do that the next 
step was to work with family 
members, who in their own way 
are the national experts on the 
natural history of the disease," 
said Harkins. Thus, on June 20, 
1981, Harkins announced the first 
meeting of the Alzheimer's and 
Related Diseases Support Group 
of Greater Richmond. 

Delores Thomson, who lives in 
a small house in Richmond, 
wasn't thinking about data banks 
on that day in June. She was 
wondering how she was going to 
keep her sanity. Married to a once 
vigorous and successful insurance 
executive, for the past 11 years 
she has been the sole provider 
and caretaker for her progres- 
sively deteriorating husband, a 
victim of Alzheimer's disease. 

Since her husband is incapable 
of caring for himself, Thomson 
has been forced to spend count- 
less months indoors watching 
over her husband's wide swings 
in mood and his slow but steady 
decline in competence, speech, 
and cognition. "I can describe him 
in one sentence," Thomson said. 
"He is the antithesis of the man I 
lived with most of my life." 

When Thomson saw an adver- 
tisement in the Richmond news- 
papers announcing the formation 
of an Alzheimer's disease support 
group, she said "she couldn't be- 
lieve it." Part of the ad contained 
a description of a typical Al- 
zheimer's patient. "The descrip- 
tion fit my husband to a 'T'," she 
recalled. "It was as if someone 
had been living in our house. The 
ad described not only my hus- 
band's behavior, but my own 
frustrations, guilt, and anger. 
When I read the ad I told myself 
this couldn't be true. How could 
they know?" 

The group, which was to be 



headed by two university doctors 
and a graduate gerontology stu- 
dent, attracted 50 people to its 
first meeting, including Thomson. 

The support group has four 
purposes and goals. Harkins ex- 
plained the group not only pro- 
vides a forum for sharing com- 
mon problems, but allows family 
members to release pent-up anger 
and frustration. These emotions 
are frequent among family mem- 
bers who often must provide al- 
most around-the-clock care to Al- 
zheimer's sufferers. "Simply 
getting to the first meeting was a 
major procedure for many of 
these people," said Harkins. 
"They literally had to find some- 
one to babysit." 

The group is designed to first 
provide sharing and self-help. 
Self-help can include offering a 
ride to one of the meetings or set- 
ting up an exchange program in 
which one person will volunteer 
to watch another's family member 
while he or she goes shopping. 

Another purpose is to educate 
family members about the dis- 
ease. Information is presented 
concerning doctors in the area 
who specialize in this disease and 
the physical aspects of Al- 
zheimer's and related illnesses. 

"Knowing what to expect, even 
if it's bad, helped me cope," said 
Thomson. "I don't like being in 
the dark about anything." 

To help educate participants, 
the group invites speakers who 
lecture on topics such as the legal 
rights of patients and the appro- 
priate steps to take when institu- 
tional care becomes necessary. 

Another goal of the group is to 
promote improved patient care. 
One area of care which is stressed 
is nutrihon. "Alzheimer's patients 
often eat continuously, or do not 
eat at all," said Harkins. "Some- 
times, in severe cases, patients 
can no longer use a fork. By alert- 
ing participants to this possibility 
we can then advise them on what 
types of food to buy." 

As participants gain insight into 
the causes of the disease and care 
of the patient, they also increase 



12 



their level of patience, which is 
often tested to unimaginable lim- 
its. "One of the things we remind 
them is that although the victims 
are losing cognitive abilities, they 
still retain rich, emotional memo- 
ries," Harkins noted. "Teaching 
family members to gracefully 
sidestep difficult situations is 
probably one of the most basic 
skills we can encourage." 

The group's fourth purpose is 
to draw attention to the disease. 
Harkins believes that the higher 
the visibility of Alzheimer's, the 
more researchers will be stimu- 
lated to isolate its causes and ar- 
rest its progress. 



In a little over one year the 
group has become so successful 
that a satellite group has been 
formed. The Richmond group's 
larger monthly meetings have 
also spawned smaller, weekly 
meetings. Under the guidance of 
a psychologist and university 
graduate students, five to six fam- 
ily members participate in the 
smaller, more intense counseling 
sessions. These sessions may be 
the first of their kind in the coun- 
try. 

Thomson, who is active in the 
large and small groups, said she 
will do anything she can to help 
foster research into "this horrible 



Funding Alzheimer's Research 

Early this spring the Virginia state legislature established an 
annual appropriation of $10,000 to support research into the 
causes and treatment of Alzheimer's and related diseases. 

The fund, which sets a national precedent for state-supported 
research grants for these illnesses, will be administered by VCU's 
Virginia Center on Aging. An awards committee consisting of 
representatives from the scientific and medical community and 
the general public will allocate grants based upon competitive 
research proposals from scientists throughout Virginia. 

The grants are intended to encourage researchers new to the 
field to initiate small-scale projects and to stimulate more es- 
tablished scientists to propose exploratory research or originate 
new directions for their investigations. 

The legislative bill for funding Alzheimer's research was widely 
advocated by members of the university's Alzheimer's family 
support groups. Through their efforts the legislature became 
increasingly aware of the incidence of Alzheimer's and related 
diseases among a growing population of elderly individuals, and 
the state's fiscal responsibilities associated with long-term care of 
these patients. 

In addition to scientific research, it is proposed that methods be 
found to help alleviate the strains and stresses which rendering 
care place upon the families of Alzheimer's victims. By increasing 
the public's understanding of Alzheimer's and its impact on 
society, it is also suggested that examination of this illness and 
related diseases may enable researchers to determine how public 
policy might lead to high quality care and treatment with the 
most effective use of public funds. 

The university's Center on Aging will be responsible for con- 
vening the awards committee, developing application procedures, 
and reviewing criteria. Staff at the center will also select and 
coordinate a special technical review committee of distinguished 
scientists from across the nation who will review proposals for 
their technical merit. The center is to maintain fiscal control of the 
grants as well as monitor the progress of projects conducted with 
the awards. 



disease." Whenever she gets the 
opportunity she speaks on radio 
and television about Alzheimer's. 
"By spreading the word I believe I 
can help other families avoid the 
suffering mine has endured." 

Harkins hopes the staff at the 
university and at MCV Hospitals 
can work together to take a lead- 
ership role in researching the 
causes and treatment of the dis- 
ease. To some extent this has al- 
ready begun through the data col- 
lected during group meetings and 
physical examinations made on 
victims in the greater Richmond 
area. 

Harkins also foresees the uni- 
versity becoming a resource cen- 
ter for disseminating information 
but believes it will take more time 
to generate enough interest to ob- 
tain the necessary funds for ex- 
tensive laboratory analyses and 
research. 

"In the meantime our biggest 
challenge is to keep the groups 
going," said Harkins. "We need to 
get the word out in any way and 
in every place we can. It's one of 
the best weapons we have for 
beating the odds." x? 

Laurel Bennett is an editor in tite Office of 
University Publications. 

Photo by Bob Llezvellyn 



13 




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Today's students are 
more self-oriented than 
they were in the past 
and show reduced con- 
cern for those who do 
not share a similar per- 
spective. 

Students might now be 
said to favor credentials 
over competence and 
style over content. 



14 



Student Attitudes 



Shifts in feelings about life and work are uncovered 



Research work described in this 
article is based on a study by Dr. 
John Mahoney, associate profes- 
sor of psychology at the univer- 
sity, and Constance L. Coogle, 
graduate assistant. Technical as- 
sistance for the project was pro- 
vided by Dr. Thomas H. Leahey, 
associate professor of psychology. 



A value is an assumed rela- 
tionship between a be- 
havior and its outcome. 
Social psychologist Milton Ro- 
keach has distinguished two ma- 
jor types of values. Terminal val- 
ues (for example, a comfortable 
life, wisdom, and salvation) are 
considered desirable end-states of 
existence. A second category, in- 
stmniental values, such as hon- 
esty7°courage, and broadminded- 
ness, help bring ultimate goals to 
fruition. 

This research project focused on 
the relationship of values and 
value systems to individual differ- 
ences in personality, belief sys- 
tems, and behavior. For several 
years the Department of Psychol- 
ogy conducted a mass-testing 
project. A variety of surveys were 
administered to student volun- 
teers who received research credit 
for their participation. Rokeach's 
value survey was often included 
in the survey packet. 

This data presented an oppor- 
tunity to compare shifts in univer- 
sity student values over an ex- 
tended period. We selected the 



academic years 1974, 1977, and 
1980 for our test group. All com- 
parisons were drawn from intro- 
ductory psychology classes, 
which were assumed to be repre- 
sentative of undergraduate stu- 
dents. 

Colleges and universities have 
been found to be remarkably 
representative institutions of 
higher education with few 
significant departures from na- 
tional norms. Because introduc- 
tory psychology is frequently 
required for many majors and is 
often an undergraduate elective, 
it is reasonable to assume that the 
results of the present study reflect 
a cross-section of university stu- 
dent values. The 1974 group con- 
sisted of 53 males and 77 females; 
for 1977 and 1980, the figures 
were 109 males and 117 females, 
and 56 males and 148 females, 
respectively. 

Research has indicated that 
values do not exist as isolated 
units, but tend to cluster in re- 
lated groups tied to more compre- 
hensive ideological dimensions. 
These dimensions can be isolated 
through factor analysis, where 
large arrays of variables are re- 
duced to a smaller group of more 
abstract entities. Rokeach con- 
ducted such an analysis of the 
aggregate 36 values which re- 
vealed that seven underlving bi- 
polar value dimensions accounted 
for a substantial portion of the 
variance. Our research supported 
Rokeach's findings. Over the 
seven-year period, shifts occurred 



in five of the seven value factors. 

Rokeach identified the first 
factor as "immediate versus de- 
layed gratification." Increased 
emphasis among VCU students 
on "a comfortable life and clean," 
coupled with a general rejection 
of "wisdom, inner harmony, and 
logical," clearly indicates a shift 
towards immediate gratification. 
This finding suggests that long- 
term goals are now of reduced 
importance for the students. 

Rokeach's second ideological 
factor is "competence versus reli- 
gious morality." This factor 
reflects a tendency to juxtapose 
"logical, imagination, intellectual, 
and independent" with "forgiv- 
ing, salvation, helpful, and 
clean." Taken as an aggregate, 
some of these values show in- 
creased importance, others de- 
creased, and still others remain 
unchanged. The students show 
no clear shift in either direction 
from 1974 to 1980. If students 
show any real change in religious 
concerns, it is in the direction of a 
more egocentric perspective. This 
supports the general view that 
today's students are more self- 
oriented than thev were in the 
past and show reduced concern 
for those who do not share a simi- 
lar perspective. 

The third factor, "self- 
constriction versus self expan- 
sion," shows a distinct shift char- 
acterized by "obedient, polite, 
and self-controlled." By contrast 



15 





Women's demands for 
economic security are 
imposing stringent de- 
mands on the industrial 
sector, the family, and 
religious and political 
institutions. 

Long-term goals are 
now of reduced impor- 
tance for students. 



16 



there is a general rejection of the 
self-expansion pole as identified 
by "broadminded and capable." 
Current students appear to favor 
increased self-monitoring in social 
acceptance rather than compe- 
tency for objective accomplish- 
ment. Students might now be 
said to favor credentials over com- 
petence and style over content. 

The general shift towards ego- 
centricity is also apparent in the 
changes observed in the fourth 
factor, "social versus personal 
orientation." "A world of peace, 
equality, and freedom" have de- 
clined in importance, while con- 
cerns with "true friendship and 
self-respect" have increased. The 
"fate of society at large" is viewed 
as increasingly less important in 
contrast to the pro-social orienta- 
tion of the 1974 sample. 

A similar change is apparent for 
the fifth factor, "societal versus 
family security." A distinct shift 



away from the concern with soci- 
etal security is reflected in a virtu- 
ally uniform decline in the impor- 
tance of "a world of beauty, 
equality, helpful, and imagina- 
tion," coupled with strong posi- 
tive shifts toward "family secu- 
rity, ambitious, and responsible." 
This change reinforces the percep- 
tion of a growing concern with 
personal success at the expense of 
social progress. 

Rokeach's sixth factor, "respect 
versus love," shows a moderate 
shift toward the respect pole with 
increased importance placed on 
self-respect and an accompanying 
rejection of mature love. This 
change may represent a greater 
degree of conformity to the stereo- 
types of the tough guy and the 
hard woman, possibly motivated 
by a fundamental sense of mutual 
distrust. 

The seventh and final factor, 
"inner versus outer directed," 



Composite terminal value rank orders for VCU introductory psychology stu- 
dents, 1974-77-80 (1, most important; 18, least important) 





Combined 


Males 




Females 


Terminal value 


'74 


'77 


'80 


'74 


'77 


'80 


'74 


'77 '80 


A comfortable life 


14 


10 


12 


14 


10 


10 


12 


10 11 


An exciting life 


12 


12 


14 


12 


11 


13 


15 


14 14 


A sense of accomplishment 


11 


8 


8 


11 


5 


5 


11 


9 8 


A world of peace 


7 


11 


10 


5 


12 


12 


8 


11 10 


A world of beauty 


13 


15 


16 


13 


15 


17 


14 


16 15 


Equality 


8 


14 


11 


8 


14 


9 


7 


12 12 


Family security 


9 


6 


3 


10 


8 


3 


6 


4 2 


Freedom 


3 


4 


5 


1 





1 


5 


8 5 


Happiness 


1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


2 


1 


1 1 


Inner harmony 


4 


5 


9 


3 


7 


8 


4 


5 9 


Mature love 


2 


9 


6 


6 


9 


11 


2 


6 6 


National security 


18 


18 


18 


17 


18 


15 


18 


18 18 


Pleasure 


15 


13 


15 


15 


13 


16 


13 


13 16 


Salvation 


16 


16 


13 


16 


17 


14 


16 


15 13 


Self-respect 


10 


2 


2 


9 


4 


6 


9 


2 3 


Social recognition 


17 


17 


17 


18 


16 


18 


17 


17 17 


True friendship 


5 


3 


4 


7 


3 


4 


3 


3 4 


Wisdom 


6 


7 


7 


4 


6 


7 


10 


7 7 



shows mixed changes for "polite, 
courageous, and independent." 
The aggregate statistical effect is 
one of no essential differences. 

It is clear that remarkable 
changes have appeared for uni- 
versity students from 1974 to 
1980, not only in rankings of indi- 
vidual values but also in basic 
dimensions of ideology. There are 
several possible causes for the 
changes. 

Substantial shifts in the makeup 
of the VCU student body have 
occurred. Over the seven-year 
span of the study, there has been 
an overall growth of the univer- 
sity population coupled with 
shifts among academic majors. 
Enrollments in business and com- 
munity service have increased 
while declining in the humanities. 
Previous research has indicated 
reliable differences in value struc- 
tures among majors in different 
fields, and these changes presum- 
ably are reflected in the university 
student body as well. 

The world has especially 
changed particularly in political 
and economic spheres. The end of 
the Vietnam War and the persist- 
ence of nagging recession, 
inflation, and unemployment 
have affected values. Other re- 
search has indicated that the clus- 
ter of values associated with im- 
mediate gratification is associated 
with economic recession. As the 
economy softens, the delay of 
gratification is viewed with a 
more critical eye. 

Noteworthy are the recent 
changes in the economic position 
of women. The past decade has 
seen an enormous influx of fe- 
males into the marketplace and 
the higher education svstem. 
Women's demands for economic 
security, independent of the in- 
creasingly insecure marital rela- 
tionship, are imposing stringent 
demands on the industrial sector, 
the family, and religious and 
political institutions. These new 
stresses are due in part to the 
growing awareness of the eco- 
nomic cost and declining social 
utilit\' of childbearing. Not only 



17 



Composite instrumental rank orders for VCU introductory psychology students, 
1974-77-80 (1, most important; 18, least important) 





Combined 


Males 




Females 


Instrumental 


'74 


'77 


'80 


'74 


'77 


'80 


'74 


'77 '80 


Ambitious 


10 


6 


7 


14 


7 


3 


8 


6 7 


Broadminded 


3 


5 


8 


1 


5 


6 


6 


5 8 


Capable 


11 


10 


13 


12 


10 


12 


10 


10 13 


Cheerful 


8 


12 


12 


9 


14 


15 


9 


9 9 


Clean 


17 


16 


16 


17 


17 


17 


16 


14 14 


Courageous 


14 


15 


14 


13 


13 


9 


13 


15 15 


Forgiving 


6 


9 


6 


8 


11 


11 


3 


8 4 


Helpful 


5 


8 


9 


4 


6 


5 


5 


11 10 


Honest 


1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 


1 1 


Imaginative 


16 


17 


17 


16 


16 


16 


17 


17 18 


Independent 


7 


4 


4 


6 


3 


4 


7 


4 5 


Intellectual 


12 


11 


10 


10 


9 


10 


12 


12 12 


Logical 


13 


14 


15 


11 


12 


14 


15 


16 16 


Loving 


2 


3 


2 


3 


4 


7 


1 


3 2 


Obedient 


18 


18 


18 


18 


18 


18 


18 


18 17 


Polite 


15 


13 


11 


15 


15 


13 


14 


13 11 


Responsible 


4 


2 


3 


5 


2 


2 


4 


2 3 


Self-controlled 


9 


7 


5 


7 


8 


8 


11 


7 6 



ing values for the arts are "imagi- 
nation" and "a world of beauty," 
and we find both values rated at a 
low and declining level. Unless 
the importance of the arts is made 
salient, there is a clear possibility 
of a dramatic erosion of the artis- 
tic tradition. 

A second noteworthy decline in 
interest centers about the value of 
competency. This is of special 
interest since it is a pronounced 
indicator for both the natural and 
social sciences. As a society, we 
have been outstanding in our 
technological successes. However, 
it is important to remember that 
technology is an applied science. 
Breakthroughs in knowledge oc- 
cur at the level of basic science 
and then are applied at the tech- 
nological level. A waning of sup- 
port for the values associated 
with competency in the basic sci- 
ences may reduce technological 
growth. ?* 

Editing by David Norris 

Photography by John H. Whitehead 



must the child be fed, clothed, and 
sheltered, but substantial re- 
sources must be directed toward 
the maintenance of health, educa- 
tion, and welfare. 

In a traditional agricultural soci- 
ety, childbearing is required for 
the survival of the parents, and a 
substantial part of the female 
lifetime is devoted to the care and 
maintenance of the offspring. This 
maintenance is extended in mod- 
ern Western society through the 
development of adolescence, a 
period of life in which the individ- 
ual is defined as biologically ma- 
ture but unprepared to enter the 
adult role. Children are not labor 
intensive so much as they are 
capital intensive. The additional 
costs of parenthood have a para- 
doxical effect. They drive women 



into the workforce while further 
increasing the cost of child- 
rearing, since working mothers 
must often pay for nursery or 
day-care facilities so they can 
work to pay for the increased 
costs of having a family. 

Additionally the costs of prepa- 
ration of adult competencies in- 
creases. An extended period of 
formal education is common for 
many entry-level jobs in business 
and industry. This requirement is 
due in part to the increased level 
of technical sophistication re- 
quired for many jobs. Conse- 
quently student interests have 
eroded in nonapplied areas such 
as the humanities, a reality that 
has changed the structure of the 
modern university. 

Several distressing notes 
emerge from the current study. 
Student concern with the arts is 
deplorably low. The distinguish- 



18 



University News 



A new hospital 
for Virginians 

One of the state's largest acute 
care hospitals will open this 
summer on the MCV Campus. 

The 14-story, 536-bed, 600,000 
square foot structure will house 
the latest in patient care equip- 
ment and facilities. The $56 mil- 
lion building will also allow for 
consolidation of many of the ser- 
vices now scattered throughout 
various buildings in the hospital 
complex. 

Among the services to be con- 
solidated are the hospital emer- 
gency rooms. The new emergency 
facility, one of the largest in the 
country, is divided into separate 
areas for medical/surgical, 
trauma, pediatric, labor and deliv- 
ery, and obstetrics/gynecology pa- 
tients. Individuals coming to 
MCV Hospitals will also find con- 
solidated and expanded operating 
and recovery rooms, radiology 
services, and obstetrics/gynecol- 
ogy, neonatal, and intensive care 
units. 

As outlined in the blueprints 
the first floor will house a number 
of service areas along with a din- 
ing facility, a flower shop, and a 
gift shop. Administrative offices 
and a meditation room are the 
main features of the second floor. 

Radiology services will com- 
prise the third floor. Thirty-three 
x-ray rooms are available along 
with adult and pediatric cardiac 
catheterizarion facilities. The 
fourth floor will be occupied by 
seven adult intensive care units. 
A total of 64 beds are available for 
patients needing intensive care. 

A surgical pavilion is situated 
on the fifth floor which houses all 
of the operating and recovery 
rooms. Surgery will be performed 
in 24 operating rooms, 12 of 
which are equipped for specialty 
surgery, and two laser rooms. 

Expanded labor and delivery 
services and a neonatal nursery 
will comprise the sixth floor. 




Fourteen labor and delivery 
rooms are located on the floor 
along with a 46-bed neonatal in- 
tensive care unit. 

Pediatrics, complete with a 12- 
crib intensive care unit and a 16- 
crib sick baby nursery, will oc- 
cupv the seventh floor. The unit 
also features an outdoor playdeck 
for children and several school- 
rooms. Postpartum and newborn 
nurseries will be situated on the 
eighth floor. 

Three floors (nine, ten and 11) 
of adult medical/surgical beds will 
be available in the new hospital. 



each of which has 86 beds. Inpa- 
tient units feature private and 
semi-private rooms arranged in 
clusters set away from main corri- 
dors. This arrangement allows se- 
riously ill patients to be placed 
near nursing stations on each of 
the floors. Everv room has a win- 
dow, intercom, and individual 
controls for heating, lighting, and 
air conditioning. Other features of 
the new hospital include all- 
weather walkways which connect 
the building with other hospital 
and clinical facilities. 

Once the new hospital opens 
renovation is scheduled to begin 



19 



University News 



on several existing facilities. Ex- 
tensive renovation is planned for 
North and West Hospitals. North 
will be devoted to patient care 
while West, which currently con- 
tains 437 beds, will be trans- 
formed from a patient care facility 
into a site for classrooms, re- 
search, and offices. The transfor- 
mation of West should help ease 
crowded conditions in several 
schools on the MCV Campus. 

Plans also call for demolishing 
East Hospital and returning South 
Hospital to the state. Both build- 
ings are used for patient care. 

The target date for completing 
the renovation package is 1986. At 
that time all patient services at 
MCV Hospitals will be consoli- 
dated within a two-block area. 

Small creatures 
on high protein 

There are extensive freshwater 
marsh systems along rivers in 
eastern and central Virginia. 
These marshes are characterized 
by submerged and emergent ve- 
getation such as pickerelweed, ar- 
row arum, and cattails. For the 
past two years, along with gradu- 
ate and undergraduate students. 
Dr. Leonard A. Smock, assistant 
professor of biology, has been in- 
vestigating the interactions be- 
tween aquatic insects and the 
plant flora of a marsh along the 
Chickahominy River northeast of 
Richmond. 

Initial work involved assessing 
the use of the different plants as a 
habitat for aquatic insects. Dis- 
tinct differences were found in the 
aquatic insect communities asso- 
ciated with the different species of 
plants. Moreover, the plants with 
more finely divided leaves har- 
bored the highest diversity, num- 
bers, and biomass of insects. 

The use of the plants as a habi- 
tat by these organisms becomes 
more complex as the plants begin 



to die and decompose. The key 
seems to be changes in the nutri- 
tional quality of the plant material 
as it decomposes. Research 
funded by the VCU Grants-in-Aid 
program focused on the protein 
and carbohydrate content of the 
plants and how this content var- 
ies with both plant species and 
the degree of composition. 

In laboratory experiments feed- 
ing preference studies were per- 
formed using common marsh 
aquatic insects. The organisms 
were fed plant material in differ- 
ent stages of decomposition and 
with varying carbohydrate and 
protein content. The organisms 
showed a preference for the spe- 
cies and state of decomposition 
providing the highest amounts of 
protein. 

Field work is being performed 
now to study changes in protein 
and carbohydrate content as 
plants decompose in order to de- 
termine how the laboratory exper- 
iments relate to actual marsh con- 
ditions. Both the colonization of 
the plants by insects as decompo- 
sition progresses and the actual 
rates of decomposition of the vari- 
ous plant species are also being 
studied. Information derived from 
these studies will be useful in fur- 
thering our understanding of 
marsh food webs and could have 
implications for the management 
of freshwater fisheries associated 
with these important ecosystems. 

Top honors 
for trauma care 

The university's Medical College 
of Virginia Hospitals complex re- 
cently became the state's first des- 
ignated trauma center when it 
was identified as a Level I center 
by the State Health Commission. 

The designation is granted for a 
period of two years and signifies 
that MCV Hospitals has met the 
American College of Surgeons' 
standards for providing the most 
intensive level of emergency care 



to severely injured patients. 

At the request of the State 
Health Department, some 90 hos- 
pitals throughout Virginia under- 
took a self-assessment of their 
trauma capabilities and were in- 
vited to apply for designation in 
one of three levels of trauma. Ini- 
tially, 44 of these hospitals sought 
a designation. 

MCVH was among four hospi- 
tals that were inspected in late 
November by a five-member team 
of trauma specialists assembled 
by the department's Division of 
Emergency Medical Services. 

A Level I designation means 
that patients having injuries to 
two or more body systems can be 
managed at the institution. It also 
means that an emergency service 
is staffed by key medical special- 
ists 24 hours a day including a 
general surgeon, a neurosurgeon, 
and a physician-anesthesiologist. 

This designation also signifies 
MCVH has trained medical per- 
sonnel and support facilities, plus 
the organizational structure, on 
an around-the-clock basis, to pro- 1 
vide a full spectrum of emergency 
treatment to severely injured pa- 
tients. At present there are fewer | 
than 20 such operational centers 
around the country as defined by 
the American College of Sur- i 

geons. 

As additional designations are 
made, rescue squad members will 
have a better idea of the emer- 
gency service capabilities of hos- 
pitals in the state. This knowledge 
is critical since the decision to 
transport a patient to a particular 
hospital is not predetermined. It 
is made by rescue squad person- 
nel in conjunction with hospital- 
based medical specialists reached 
from the scene via radio or tele- 
phone. 



20 



Artful detection 

The single most consulted bio- 
graphical and bibliographical 
source in the discipline of art his- 
tory is known simply as "Thieme- 
Becker." The first volume ap- 
peared in Leipzig in 1907 entitled 
Allegemeines Lexikon der bildenden 
Kilnstler von Antike bis sur Ge- 
genwart, edited by German 
scholars Dr. Ulrich Thieme and 
Dr. Felix Becker. The work pro- 
vided encyclopedic entries on 
worldwide artists from all peri- 
ods. 

Over the next 43 years, 36 addi- 
tional volumes were published. 
Dr. Thieme had died; volumes 14- 
16 were edited by Dr. Becker and 
Frederick Willis, and in 1923 Dr. 
Hans Vollmer became sole editor 
of the series. "Thieme-Becker" 
may drop out of the art historian's 
vocabulary when the first volume 
of a new, expanded, and retitled 
edition appears this year in Leip- 
zig — the Kiinstlerlexikon (chemals 
Thieme-Becker). 

Dr. James Phillips of the univer- 
sity's Department of Art History 
was commissioned to undertake 
research on 43 American artists 
with the family name of Allen. 
Dr. Phillips returned entries on 
110 American Aliens. The list in- 
cluded painters, sculptors, 
graphic artists, cartoonists, silver- 
smiths, cabinetmakers, and archi- 
tects. Many were ephemeral, but 
they have been included. 

The book is an exhaustive list- 
ing of both famous and little- 
known names. This gives it great 
strength for reference use. If a 
painting of a bowl of apples in 
grandmother's attic were signed 
"Charles Allen," the new edition 
of the book would show him born 
in 1864 (place unknown), died in 
1892 in Detroit, Michigan, and ac- 
tive in that city between 1885 and 
1892 where he studied, taught, 
and exhibited still-life paintings 
with the Detroit Artists' Associa- 
tion in 1891. Follow-up could be 
through the Detroit Public Li- 
brary, although in this case Dr. 



PhUlips found nothing further. 
Such research can take novel 
turns and resemble the work of a 
private detective. In discussion 
with Joan MuUer, librarian in the 
university's School of the Arts Li- 
brary, Dr. Phillips learned that 
Courtney Allen was associated 
with an art colony in Province- 
town, Massachusetts, where Mul- 
ler spent childhood summers. Mr. 




and Mrs. Walter Chrysler of the 
Chrysler Museum in Norfolk, Vir- 
ginia, had previously established 
a museum in Provincetown. Dr. 
Phillips went to Norfolk where 
Mrs. Chrysler led him to a clip- 
ping file and a large chest which 
came from Allen's studio and con- 
tained his working file of photo- 
graphs and sketches for magazine 
illustrations done in the 1930s and 
1940s. It transpired that Allen's 
wife had also been an artist. Their 
daughter lived in Virginia. A tele- 
phone call to the daughter gave 
Dr. Phillips a complete biography 
of the mother and the Kiinstlerlex- 
ikon an entirely new artist. 

A center for the 
performing arts 

Undeterred by this winter's unu- 
sual snow and ice storms, con- 
struction on VCU's new perform- 
ing arts building is almost 
complete and an opening date is 
scheduled for this fall. 

Containing an attractive stage 
and studio features, the $5.6 



million, three-story building will 
house the music and theatre 
departments which have just 
about outgrown their temporary 
quarters. 

In addition to a concert hall 
with seating for 502 people and a 
modern theatre holding 257, the 
first level of the climate-controlled 
building will include a variety of 
seminar rooms and a large theatre 
workshop where students will 
construct their own equipment. 
Space has also been provided for 
department heads and for admin- 
istration and faculty. Carpeting 
will cover the lobby area where 
the box office, main elevators, and 
coat rooms are located. 

The lower level will contain 
prop, costume, and scenery 
storage space, dance and move- 
ment studios, and 17 sound- 
insulated rehearsal rooms. 

The new facility should be able 
to accommodate the demanding 
performance schedules of both 
the theatre and music depart- 
ments. People who enjoyed the 
Shafer Street Playhouse, the site 
of many productions, will be 
happy to know the theatre will 
still be used for som.e drama 
performances. 

Dancing to 
better health 

Aerobic dancing can help some 
women with mild cases of hyper- 
tension. 

That's the conclusion of a study 
conducted by Dr. Jeannette Kis- 
singer, associate professor of 
nursing. Kissinger's study was 
funded by a university grant-in- 
aid. 

Women with mild hypertension 
(diastolic pressures of 90-104) who 
were using a diuretic medication 
were selected as subjects for the 
study. Twenty-eight women par- 
ticipated, divided equally into a 
control group and an experimen- 
tal group. No patient was over 62 



21 



University News 



years of age or more than 40 
pounds overweight. 

Members of the control group 
continued normal activity 
throughout the ten-week study, 
had their blood pressures taken 
every week, and continued on the 
same dosages of their diuretic 
medication. Subjects in the exper- 
imental group met three times a 
week for one hour and engaged 
in aerobic dance routines. To en- 
sure safety, subjects in this group 
were examined by a cardiologist 
to determine their maximum 
heart rates before the study com- 
menced. 

The results of the study proved 
positive. After seven weeks of 
dancing, statistically significant 
reductions in the diastolic pres- 
sure readings of patients in the 
experimental group were evident. 
In fact, four of the subjects were 
able to go on reduced medication. 

Kissinger emphasized that aero- 
bic dancing is beneficial because it 
makes the muscles more efficient 
which decreases the amount of 
blood the heart must pump to 
them. Consequently, pulse rate 
slows and blood pressure de- 
creases. 

Investigating 
infants' hearing 

A study to investigate an infant's 
ability to separate sound into its 
component frequencies, a capac- 
ity believed to be important in the 
perception of speech, is being 
conducted at the university. 

Dr. Lynne Olsho, assistant pro- 
fessor of psychology, is conduct- 
ing the study in the university's 
developmental psychology labora- 
tory. The project is funded by the 
Biomedical Grants-in-Aid Pro- 
gram. 

As part of the study infants 
ages four to eight months wear 
specially made headsets over 
which sounds are presented. 
Children sit in a parent's lap 
throughout the testing and are 



taught to turn their heads to indi- 
cate hearing a certain sound. 

Olsho said the sounds are not 
aversive or irritating, and sound 
levels are never greater than a 
loud conversational tone. "The in- 
fants may find the procedure an 
interesting game," she said. 

Cataloging 
birth defects 

In recognition of the need for an 
organized system for monitoring 
children born with defects in Vir- 
ginia, the Developmental Disabili- 
ties Unit of the Department of 
Mental Health and Mental Retar- 
dation has awarded the university 
a grant to establish the Virginia 
Birth Defects Registry. 

Virginia currently lacks a coor- 
dinated program for monitoring 
children with congenital defects 
and providing voluntary compre- 
hensive genetic services for these 
individuals and their families, ac- 
cording to Dr. Linda Corey, assist- 
ant professor of human genetics. 



"This shortcoming stems from a 
lack of an organized method of 
case identification and referral 
which is consistent with the exist- 
ing health care delivery system, 
and the absence of an organized 
system of record keeping for indi- 
viduals with defects which could 
be used to provide information on 
the existence of similar malforma- 
tions in distant relatives of af- 
fected individuals," said Corey. 

In most cases a family history of 
a simOar defect has a great influ- 
ence on the estimated risk of re- 
currence of this defect in subse- 
quent pregnancies for the parent 
of the affected infant. 

Corey, who will serve as pro- 
gram director, believes the regis- 
try will give Virginia the system- 
atic case identification and referral 
process it needs. The registry wUl 
also provide information regard- 
ing the incidence and prevalence 
of congenital malformations of ge- 
netic origin in the state and help 
upgrade the quality of services 
available to Virginians with disa- 
bling conditions. It will fully pro- 
tect the rights and privacy of indi- i 




22 



viduals and data sources. 

"All information gathered will 
be confidential," said Corey. "The 
information relative to the exis- 
tence of any possible genealogic 
linkage between newly diagnosed 
cases and similarly affected indi- 
viduals already contained in the 
registry will be made available to 
physicians submitting a birth de- 
fects report or providing primary 
health care to the affected individ- 
ual." 

She added that no affected indi- 
viduals will be contacted directly 
by the registry. All contacts will 
be through physicians. 

For additional information con- 
tact Corey at the Virginia Birth De- 
fects Registry, VCU, Box 33, Rich- 
mond, VA 23298, (804) 786-9632. 

The economics 
of auctions 

An assistant professor of eco- 
nomics has been awarded a fac- 
ulty grant-in-aid to investigate 
variations in prices at different 
types of auctions. 

G. Thomas West sees a relation- 
ship between prices and the dif- 
ferent methods in which items are 
auctioned — English oral, Dutch, 
and sealed bid. West and Dr. Ro- 
bert J. Reilly, assistant professor 
of economics who is assisting 
with the study, believe one or an- 
other of the auctions may com- 
mand higher prices for items be- 
ing sold. 

According to West, a lot of emo- 
tion can be buOt up during a typi- 
cal English oral auction, probably 
the best known form of auction- 
ing. During the auction bids start 
low and continue until one per- 
son is willing to pay a certain 
price. 

The two other types of auc- 
tions, Dutch and sealed bid, 
which might seem less frenzied 
than the English variety, generate 
just as much emotion, if not 
more. West noted. 

The Dutch auction begins with 



the auctioneer offering high 
prices. Prices go down until 
someone makes a bid. The first 
bid gets the sale. West said this 
form of auction may be the most 
anxiety provoking since bidders 
do not know if they should bid or 
wait for the price to go down. 

The sealed bid, or silent auc- 
tion, is often used for awarding 
government contracts. In this 
type of auction the bidder must 
weigh how much the item is 
worth to himself and to all the 
other bidders. The highest bidder 
is the winner when an item is be- 
ing sold, while the lowest bidder 
wins when an item is being 
awarded. 

The study will involve VCU ec- 
onomics students who will partic- 
ipate in several of the types of 
auctions. "The results of the 
study might eventually affect how 
different items are auctioned," 
said West. 

Giving children 
a healthy smile 

A new pediatric dentistry clinic 
has opened on the university's 
MCV Campus. 

The 3,000 square foot facility 
will have 12 chairs in a general 
clinic area using an open-bay de- 
sign, a three-chair clinic for post- 
doctoral studies or special patient 
care, and a quiet room equipped 
with a one-way observation mir- 
ror. The facility will also have a 
parent consultation room and pre- 
ventive hygiene area. 

"The clinic will allow students 
to provide care in the most up-to- 
date surroundings possible," said 
Dr. Frank Farrington, chairman of 
the Department of Pediatric Den- 
tistry. 

The facility will accommodate 
about 30 children per day ranging 
in ages from preschool to teens. 
Handicapped children and 
youngsters with unusual or spe- 



cial dental needs will also receive 
care in the new facility. 

The clinic is located on the third 
floor of the university's Wood Me- 
morial Building. 

Exploring 
education 
in England 

Innovative approaches to elemen- 
tary and special education pro- 
grams in northwestern England 
will be studied in a two-week tour 
offered June 19-]uly 2 by VCU's 
Division of Continuing Studies 
and Public Service. 

The study tour is designed for 
teachers and administrators inter- 
ested in comparative practices in 
Europe and the United States. 
The tour, which costs $1,055, in- 
cludes air transportation from Bal- 
timore to London and return, ac- 
commodations and breakfast, bus 
transfers from London to Liver- 
pool, ground transportation, tui- 
tion, and field trips. 

Dr. Howard Garner, associate 
professor of education, will ac- 
company the tour. A Fulbright- 
Hays recipient. Garner recently 
taught for one year at the Univer- 
sity of Liverpool. 

Individuals wishing to earn 
graduate credit for the tour 
should enroll in Education 641. A 
paper will be assigned to explore 
innovative practices in the British 
educational system and how they 
compare with American practices. 
The course carries three credits. 

Participants in the tour will 
study as a group during the first 
week and visit various elementary 
and special education programs in 
the Liverpool metropolitan area. 
Educators from the University of 
Liverpool will provide informa- 
tion and perspectives. 

During the second week tour 
members will be assigned individ- 
ually to schools similar to those in 
which they work in the United 
States and will be house guests of 



23 



University News 



faculty members. Extended study 
and discussion of a particular 
school, along with the opportu- 
nity to experience English home 
life, are key parts of the tour. 

Further information is available 
by writing or calling VCU's Inter- 
national Studies Office at 301 
West Franklin Street, Richmond, 
VA 23220, (804) 786-0342. 

Rams relinquish 
Sun Belt crown 

VCU was unsuccessful in its quest 
for a third consecutive Sun Belt 
Conference basketball champion- 
ship this season. 

The Rams, winners of the last 
two Sun Belt titles, relinquished 
this year's honors to the Univer- 
sity of Alabama-Birmingham. The 
two teams met in the Sun Belt 
tournament's championship game 
with the Blazers winning 94-83. 

That loss ended the Rams' sea- 
son with a 17-11 record. It also de- 
stroyed any hope of a return to 
the National Collegiate Athletic 
Association (NCAA) tournament. 
Last year VCU won its way into 
the tournament's second round 
before losing to the University of 
Tennessee. 

The season did end on a bright 
note for two members of the 
squad. Kenny Stancell, a senior 
center, was named to the first 
team All-Sun Belt Conference 
squad and Monty Knight, a senior 
guard, was named to the second 
team. 

The Rams will lose Stancell and 
Knight, along with reserve Tim 
Carr, next season. Coach J. D. 
Barnett has already begun to fill 
the void the loss of these players 
will create. Michael Brown, a 
high-scoring forward from Flope- 
well High School in Hopewell, 
Virginia, recently signed with 
Barnett to play for the university 
next year. 



Changing 
the guard 



New deans for VCU's Schools of 
Basic Sciences and Pharmacy have 
been appointed by the Board of 
Visitors. 

Dr. S. Gaylen Bradley, chair- 
man of the Department of Micro- 
biology in the School of Basic Sci- 
ences since 1968, will replace Dr. 
Daniel T. Watts as dean of the 
school July 1. Watts is retiring. 

Dr. John S. Ruggiero, assistant 
vice-president for science and 
technology for the Pharmaceutical 
Manufacturers Association, be- 
came dean of pharmacy June 1. 
He replaced Dr. Warren Weaver 
who retired last year after 31 
years of service. 

Bradley, 39, has taught pharma- 
cology at VCU since 1979. Previ- 
ously, he was a visiting scholar at 
the University of Cambridge and 
a consultant to pharmaceutical 
companies and the Minneapolis 
Veterans Administration Hospital. 
He has served in the microbiol- 
ogy, genetics, botany, and bacteri- 
ology and immunology depart- 
ments at the University of 
Minnesota. 

Bradley is a life member and 
fellow of the American Associa- 
tion for the Advancement of Sci- 
ence, a fellow of the Virginia Aca- 
demy of Science, and a life 
member of the New York Aca- 
demy of Sciences. He is the 
author or co-author of 144 papers. 

Ruggiero, 50, has been asso- 
ciated with the Pharmaceutical 
Manufacturers Association since 
1970 when he left the post of as- 
sistant to the academic vice-presi- 
dent of Duquesne University in 
Pennsylvania. His responsibilities 
included scientific and profes- 
sional relations, economic re- 
search, and planning. 

Ruggerio has been listed since 
1962 in Who's Who hi America and 
Who's Who American Men of Sci- 
ence. He is a former fellow of the 
American Foundation for Pharma- 



ceutical Education and author of a 
dozen articles or chapters in pro- 
fessional journals and books. 



Touring 

America's 

heritage 



Study tours to southwestern 
United States and the Yucatan are 
being sponsored by the univer- 
sity's Department of Sociology 
and Anthropology. 

The tour to the southwestern 
portion of the United States is 
scheduled for July 26-August 5. 
During the course participants 
will learn about the tricultural 
heritage — Indian, Spanish, and 
English — of that area. Course- 
work will preceed the trip in June. 

Participants will fly from Rich- 
mond to Albuquerque, New Mex- 
ico. Sites to be visited there in- 
clude Old Town, the Maxwell 
Museum of Anthropology, Cor- 
onado's Monument, and the 
Pueblo Indian Cultural Center. 
Other prehistoric and cultural si- 
tes to be investigated include 
Santa Fe, Chaco Canyon, Mesa 
Verde, Flagstaff, the Hopi Mesas, 
and the Navajo country. 

The tour will cost approxi- 
mately $1,000 which includes air- 
fare, accommodations, and activi- 
ties. 

The Yucatan tour, during which 
participants will visit several sites 
the Maya Indians once inhabited, 
is planned for January 1983. Areas 
to be visited include Merida, Villa- 
hermosa, Palenque, Chichen Itza, 
Uxmal, Kabah, and Tulum. 

This tour will cost approxi- 
mately $1,200 which includes air- 
fare, accommodations, and two 
meals per day. 

Each tour carries three aca- 
demic credits. 

Individuals interested in either 
tour should contact Gordon 
Bronitsky, Department of Sociol- 
ogy and Anthropology, at (804) 
786-1118. 



24 



Newsmakers 



Walton Beacham, associate pro- 
fessor of English, has edited 
seven volumes of The Critical Sur- 
vey of Short Fiction. He is editing 
three multi-volume sets in drama, 
poetry, and the novel for Salem 
Press. 

Dr. Joseph Bendersky, assistant 
professor of history, had his 
book. Constitutional Stability and 
Dictatorship: A Political Biography of 
Carl Schmitt, accepted for publica- 
tion by Princeton University 
Press. 

Dr. Mark Booth, assistant pro- 
fessor of English, had his book. 

The Experience of Songs, published 
by Yale University Press. 

Dr. James Boykin, professor of 
real estate, has been elected to a 
three-year term on the governing 
council of the American Institute 
of Real Estate Appraisers. 

Dr. Joseph Boykin, Jr., instruc- 
tor in physiology and resident in 
surgery, has received the 25th 
Schering Scholarship Award from 
the American College of Sur- 
geons. He is one of three recipi- 
ents of the annual $5,000 av^ard. 

Dr. Meta Braymer, coordinator 
of nontraditional studies for 
Continuing Studies and Public 
Service, v^as elected chairman of 
the Division of Special Certificate 
and Degree Programs at the an- 
nual meeting of the National 
University Continuing Education 
Association. 

Dr. Melvin Ching, associate 
professor of anatomy, was co- 
chairman of the hypothalamus 
and pituitary session of the Amer- 
ican Association of Anatomists' 
95th annual meeting in Indianap- 
olis. 

Dr. I. Kelman Cohen, chairman 
of the Division of Plastic and Re- 
constructive Surgery, published a 
summary report on new develop- 
ments in plastic surgery and burn 



treatment in the January issue of 
the Bulletin of the American College 
of Surgeons. 

Dr. Rutledge Dennis, associate 
professor of sociology, has been 
elected president of the Associa- 
tion of Black Sociologists. 

Dr. Clifford Edwards, professor 
of philosophy and religious stud- 
ies, received an award from the 
international journal Modern 
Haiku for his series "Haiku 
Mondo," considered the most 
valuable series in an English lan- 
guage journal in 1981. 

Dr. Harold Fallon, chairman 
of the Department of Medicine, 
has been appointed to the Na- 
tional Arthritis, Diabetes, and Di- 
gestive and Kidney Diseases Ad- 
visory Council. He will advise the 
National Institute of Arthritis, Di- 
abetes, and Digestive and Kidney 
Diseases, a component of the Na- 
tional Institutes of Health, con- 
cerning its program of grants and 
awards for biomedical research. 

Dr. Leigh Grosenick, professor 
of public administration and in- 
terim director of the doctorate in 
public administration program, 
received the 1981 Merit Award 
from the National Association of 
Towns and Townships for provid- 
ing support and leadership to the 
association. 

Ben Gunter, chairman of the 
Department of Interior Design, 
has been named to the board of 
visitors of the Foundation for 
Interior Design Education Re- 
search. 

Dr. Curtis Hall, dean of the 
School of Business, recently ac- 
cepted a $1,000 award for work by 
the school on "Value Judgment in 
Economic Problems." The presen- 
tation was made at the 29th an- 
nual meeting of the Southern 
Business Administration Associa- 
tion in Atlanta. 



Dr. Ralph Hambrick, Jr., direc- 
tor of the Center for Public Af- 
fairs, is vice-president and a 
member of the editorial board of 
the Southern Consortium of Uni- 
versity Public Service Organiza- 
tions. 

Dr. Tapan Hazra, professor of 
radiology and pediatrics and 
chairman of the Division of Radia- 
tion Therapy and Oncology, has 
been named American Cancer So- 
ciety professor of clinical oncol- 
ogy- 

Dr. William Hellmuth, chair- 
man of the Department of Eco- 
nomics, was a member of the res- 
olutions and program committees 
and chaired a session on "Taxes 
for Social Polity?" at the annual 
conference of taxation of the Na- 
tional Tax Association-Tax Insti- 
tute of America in Chicago. 

Dr. John Hill, chairman of the 
Department of Psychology, pre- 
sented the keynote address and 
conducted workshops on early 
adolescence at the annual meeting 
of the East Asian Region Council 
of American Overseas Schools in 
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. 

Dr. Robert Holsworth, assist- 
ant professor of political science, 
had his book, American Politics and 
Everyday Life, published by John 
Wiley and Sons. The book is co- 
authored by J. Harry Wray of 
DePaul University. 

Dr. Puru Jena, associate profes- 
sor of physics, has been selected 
by the National Science Founda- 
tion to participate in the United 
States/India Exchange of Scientists 
Program. 

Evelyn Jez, instructor in En- 
glish, has been nominated to 
serve a three-year term on the 
board of the Richmond Human 
Rights Coalition Foundation. 

Dr. Gordon Keesee, Jr., profes- 
sor and director of student services. 



25 



Newsmakers 



has been elected chairman 
of the Virginia Board of Profes- 
sional Counselors. 

Dr. Susan Kennedy, professor 
of history, has published a book 
titled America's White Worl<ing- 
Class Women: A Historical Bibliogra- 
phy with Garland Press. 

Myles Lash, executive direc- 
tor of the university's Medical 
College of Virginia Hospitals, has 
been selected the 1982 "Young 
Hospital Administrator of the 
Year" bv the American College of 
Hospital Administrators. The 
award is granted annually by the 
Chicago-based professional soci- 
ety in cooperation with VCU's De- 
partment of Health Administra- 
tion as a tribute to Robert S. 
Hudgens who directed the School 
of Hospital Administration from 
1957-1966. 



David Mathis, director of 
university publications, has been 
elected co-chairman of the Uni- 
versity Research Magazine Asso- 
ciation. 

Gerard McCabe, director of 
university libraries, is senior edi- 
tor of Advances in Library Adminis- 
tration and Organization, Volume I, 
1982. 

Dr. Michael Miller, assistant 
professor of English, has been 
elected secretary of the South 
Atlantic Modern Language Asso- 
ciation linguistics section. 

Dr. James Moore, associate pro- 
fessor of history, has been ap- 
pointed to the editorial board of 

the Journal of Southern History. 

Dr. Page Smith Morahan, 

professor of microbiology and 
medicine, has been named one of 
ten outstanding women in the 
Richmond area by the Young 
Women's Christian Association. 



Dr. Charlotte Morse, associate 
professor of English, has received 
a National Endowment for the 
Humanities fellowship in the 
College Teachers Program. 

Dr. Charles O'Neal, associate 
professor of microbiology, is 
chairman of the Occupational 
Health and Safety Committee of 
the American Institute of Chem- 
ists. He is also a member of the 
Long-Range Planning Committee 
of the Scientific Manpower Com- 
mission. 

Dr. Edward Peeples, Jr., associ- 
ate professor of preventive medi- 
cine, has been elected to the 
Board of Directors of the Associa- 
tion for Behavioral Sciences and 
Medical Education. 

James Pendleton, professor of 
English, is author of the play 
"Ralegh!" which is being pro- 
duced by Davidson College. 

Dr. John Salley, vice-president 
for research and dean of graduate 
studies, has been elected vice- 
president of the Conference of 
Southern Graduate Schools. 

Gary Sange, assistant professor 
of English, had his book of po- 
etry. Sudden Around the Bend, pub- 
lished by the University of Mis- 
souri Press. 

Dr. Michael Scheflan, assistant 
professor of surgery, has devel- 
oped a new breast reconstruction 
operation which is featured in the 
January issue of the Bulletin of the 
American College of Surgeoits. 

Dr. Dorothy Scura, associate 
professor of English, has been 
elected president of the Women's 
Caucus of the Modern Language 
Association for 1982-84 and chair- 
man for 1982 of the Advanced 
Writing Discussion Circle of the 
South Atlantic Modern Language 
Association. 



Sue Self, assistant professor. 
University Libraries and Visual 
Education Services, has been 
elected to the board of governors 
of the Association of Medical Il- 
lustrators. She is also co-editor of 
the Journal of Biocomnnmication. 

Dr. Wade Smith, associate pro- 
fessor of medicine, has been ap- 
pointed chief of the hematology- 
oncology section at Richmond's 
McGuire Veterans Administration 
Medical Center. 

Dr. William Spencer, associate 
professor of pediatrics and medi- 
cal co-director of the family nurse 
practitioner program, is presi- 
dent-elect and program chairman 
of the Southeastern Allergy Asso- 
ciation. 

Dr. George Vennart, chair- 
man of the university's Depart- 
ment of Pathology, has been ap- 
pointed to the Part I pathology 
test committee of the National 
Board of Examiners. Committee 
members are responsible for de- 
veloping National Board examina- 
tions and assuring the quality and 
integrity of the board's evaluation 
system. 

Dr. Henri Warmenhoven, asso- 
ciate professor of political science, 
participated on a panel dealing 
with ethnic minorities in Western 
Europe at the European Studies 
Conference in Omaha. 

Dr. Charles Watlington, profes- 
sor of medicine, has been elected 
president of the Richmond area 
chapter, American Diabetes Asso- 
ciation, Virginia affiliate. 

Dr. Maurice Wood, professor 
and director of research in the De- 
partment of Family Practice, has 
been named a member of the In- 
stitute of Medicine. 



26 



Alumni Update 



1912 



1950 



Albert del Castillo (D.D.S.) re- 
ceived the 1981 Citizen of the Year 
Award from the Chamber of 
Commerce in Richlands, Virginia. 



1940 



Pearl L. Moeller (B.F.A.) has 
retired from the Museum of Mod- 
ern Art in New York after 39 years 
of service. 



1941 



Herbert C. Allen, Jr., (M.D., 
resident 1947) is the owner of Nu- 
clear Medicine Laboratories of 
Texas. He serves as the American 
College of Nuclear Medicine's del- 
egate to the American Medical 
Association. 

Lloyd L. Hobbs (D.D.S.) has 
been elected chairman of the 
Board of Directors of the National 
Bank of Blacksburg. Hobbs is a 
Paul Harris Fellow of Rotary In- 
ternational and a member of the 
Appalachian State University Ath- 
letic Hall of Fame. 



1943 



Anne P. Satterfield (B.S. social 
science) has been named to the 
Governor's Economic Advisory 
Council. 



1945 



George A. Zirkle, Jr., (M.D.) is 
serving as state chairman of the 
Tennessee chapter of the Ameri- 
can Academy of Pediatrics. 



1946 



Patricia R. Perkinson (B.S. soci- 
ology, M.S. psychology 1956) 
served as personnel director for 
Virginia Governor Charles S. 
Robb's transition team. 



1948 



Nelson K. Reid (certificate in 
distributive education) is presi- 
dent of Ideal Enterprises, Inc., 
and Southern Specialties, Inc., 
both in Burlington, North Caro- 
lina. 



Caroline Hogshead (B.S. recre- 
ation) recently received the U.S. 
Army Commander's Award for 
CivUian Service. The award is the 
Army's highest recognition for 
meritorious civilian service. 



1951 



Lois F. Einhorn (B.S. applied 
science) is working as a dental of- 
fice manager in Norfolk, Virginia. 



1952 



Thomas W. Rorrer, Jr., (B.S. 
pharmacy), is a member of the 
Virginia State Board of Pharmacy. 

Peter W. Squire (M.D.) is presi- 
dent of the Southside Virginia 
Medical Society. 



1953 



Robert W. Clyburn (B.S. phar- 
macy) has been appointed to a 
four-year term on the Virginia 
Beach School Board. He also 
serves as the citizen appointee on 
the Southeastern Virginia District 
Planning Commission and secre- 
tary for the Southeastern Virginia 
Seniors Model Program. 

Jack Peters (B.S. pharmacy) is 
vice-president of Hope Medical. 



1955 



Arthur B. Frazier (M.D.) is 
president of the American Cancer 
Society's Virginia Division. He is a 
radiation oncologist with the can- 
cer center at Roanoke Memorial 
Hospital. 

Jean L. Harris (medicine, junior 
assistant resident 1957) has joined 
Control Data Corporation, a 
multinational conglomerate with 
headquarters in Minneapolis, 
Minnesota. She is the former sec- 
retary of human resources for the 
Commonwealth of Virginia. 



1957 



Carolyn Jo Leonard (B.S. nurs- 
ing) has been appointed general 



counsel for Alexian Brothers of 
America, Inc., in Elk Grove Vil- 
lage, Illinois. 

1958 

Dianne W. Bynum (B.S. distrib- 
utive education, M.S. distributive 
education 1967) is the owner of D. 
W. Bynum and Associates in 
Houston, Texas, a placement ser- 
vice for training and development 
professionals. 

Winfred Ward (M.D.) is author 
of The Healing of Lia, a book on the 
use of hypnosis in psychiatric 
therapy to explore and treat a pa- 
tient's two personalities. 

Marvin F. West (D.D.S.) has 
been elected president of the Soci- 
ety of Alumni of the College of 
William and Mary in Williams- 
burg, Virginia. 

1959 

Edgar P. Gray (B.S. business) 
has been named vice-president 
for distribution by Thalhimers 
Brothers, Inc. in Richmond. 

Dr. Frank I. Gross (pharmacy) 
has been elected president of the 
Richmond Academy of Podiatric 
Medicine. 

Allen L. Wallace (B.S. business 
administration) has been pro- 
moted to vice-president in the 
item processing department of the 
capital region operation by United 
Virginia Bank. 

1960 

Clyde R. Hodge (B.S. phar- 
macy) has been promoted to man- 
ager of Plant A in the Operations 
Division of A. H. Robins Com- 
pany. 

Janice G. Smith (B.F.A. art ed- 
ucation) represented VCU at the 
April inauguration of President 
Roy B. ShUHng, Jr., at Southwest- 
ern University in Georgetown, 
Texas. 

1961 

Kenneth H. Axtell (M.H.A.) is 
serving as a member of the Tide- 
water Hospital Council. 

17 



Alumni Update 



Roger D. Neathawk (phar- 
macy, M.S. business, 1978) has 
been named executive vice-presi- 
dent of Mary Immaculate Hospital 
in Newport News, Virginia. He 
was formerly director of planning 
for St. Mary's Hospital in Rich- 
mond. 

1962 

Elmer R. Deffenbaugh, Jr., 

(pharmacy) has been promoted to 
manager of technical information 
and convention services in the 
pharmaceutical division of A. H. 
Robins Company. 



Rings 




Class Rings 

If you failed to buy a class ring as a 
student you can now order one. 
Rings for men and women are 
available in a variety of styles. For 
more information and a price list, 
write for a ring order kit. Please 
specify whether the ring is for a 
man or woman. Your request 
should be mailed to: 

Alumni Activities Office, 
Virginia Commonwealth Univer- 
sity, Richmond, Virginia 23284. 



Austin B. Harrelson (M.D. neu- 
rology resident 1966) is president 
of the medical staff at St. Mary's 
Hospital in Richmond and presi- 
dent of the Southern Clinical 
Neurology Society. 

James L. Hill (B.S. business) 
has been appointed vice-president 
of First Virginia Bank — Northern 
Neck. 

1963 

Jefferson E. Pitts (B.S. applied 
science) has been promoted to 
manager of technical coordination 
in the drug metabolism depart- 
ment of A. H. Robins Company's 
Research and Development Divi- 
sion. The company's headquar- 
ters are in Richmond. 

1965 

Reid Icard (B.F.A. commercial 
arts and design) has been named 
creative director by Stuart Ford 
Inc. 

Jerry F. Law (B.F.A. interior de- 
sign) has received the American 
Society of Interior Designers/Sca- 
lamandre first place award for her 
restoration and renovation of the 
Hermitage Hotel in Nashville, 
Tennessee. 

1966 

Daniel H. Gerritz (B.S. busi- 
ness, M.S. business 1969) has 
been named second vice-presi- 
dent for administration by the 
Life Insurance Company of Vir- 
ginia. 

David O. Holman (B.S. psy- 
chology) has been elected a senior 
vice-president by Southern Bank 
in Richmond. 

Rudy Shackleford (B.A. music 
composition) had his composition 
"Olive Tree, First Pilgrim" per- 
formed in March by Leonard 
Raver, organist with the New 
York Philharmonic. He is cur- 
rently editing a collection of es- 
says by Luigi Dallapiccola for 
publication by the Toccata Press in 
London. 



Roland Wheeler (B.S. physical 
education) has been named direc- 
tor of auxiliary enterprises and 
university services at Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute and State 
University in Blacksburg, Vir- 
ginia. 

1967 

Joyce Forrest (B.S. business ed- 
ucation, M.S. business 1970) has 
been elected executive vice-presi- 
dent of the Richmond chapter of 
the Data Processing Management 
Association. 

Mary Ellen Fraley (M.S. social 
work) is chairman of the board of 
Lynchburg Montessori School in 
Lynchburg, Virginia. 

1968 

Frederic D. Fraley (M.S.W.) is 
regional director of the Virginia I 

Department of Welfare. He is also 
president of the Exchange Club of 
Lynchburg, Virginia. 

William C. Harris (B.S. ac- 
counting) has been named head 
of United Virginia Bank's national 
division in the corporate banking 
group. 

Richard B. Weston (B.M. ap- 
plied music) is a sales representa- 
tive with Copy Van Inc., a print- 
ing organization in Richmond. 

Richard B. Wiltshire, Jr., (B.S. 
general business) has been pro- 
moted to executive vice-president 
of the Second National Bank in 
Culpeper, Virginia. He is also a 
member of the board of directors. 

1969 

Shirley-Ann Beiseigel (M.S. re- 
habilitation counseling) is director 
of psychological services at the 
Good Shepherd Rehabilitation 
Hospital in Allentown, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

H. Randall Brooks (B.S. ac- 
counting, M.S. business 1974) has 
formed his own company, H. 
Randall Brooks and Associates, 
which specializes in information 
systems consulting. 



28 



J. B. Call, III, (B.S. general busi- 
ness) has been named vice-presi- 
dent of the Richmond metropoli- 
tan chapter of the American 
Institute of Real Estate Apprais- 
ers. He is president of J. B. Call, 
111, and Associates. 

Patricia S. Eby (B.S. nursing) 
represented VCU at the inaugura- 
tion of Paula Pimlott Brownlee as 
president of Hollins College in 
April. She is a member of the Me- 
dical College of Virginia Alumni 
Association's board of trustees. 

Lois Garrison (B.F.A. fashion 
art) has been named vice-presi- 
dent by Siddall, Matus, and 
Coughter, a Richmond advertis- 
ing firm. 

William M. Ginther (B.S. busi- 
ness management, M.S. business 
1974) has been named a senior 
vice-president of the automated 
information services division by 
United Virginia Bank. 

Richardson Grinnan (M.D.) has 
been elected vice-president of me- 
dical affairs for Blue Cross and 
Blue Shield of Virginia. He is the 
chief medical officer responsible 
for corporate medical affairs in- 
cluding medical policy develop- 
ment and implementation. 

George S. Rowland (B.F.A. ), 
assistant professor of art at Alle- 
gheny College in Meadville, 
Pennsylvania, has received ten- 
ure. 

1970 

Patrick T. Allen (B.S. business 
administration) has been ap- 
pointed assistant secretary for un- 
derwriting by the Life Insurance 
Company of Virginia. 

John Fanning (B.S. rehabilita- 
tion counseling) is executive di- 
rector of the Hozhoni Foundation, 
a private, nonprofit organization 
serving moderately and severely 
retarded citizens in northern Ar- 
izona. 



Robert P. Hilldrup (M.Ed, ad- 
ministration and supervision) has 
been named director of the media 
services office at Mary Washing- 
ton College in Fredericksburg, 
Virginia. 

Eugene H. Randall (M.D.) has 
been appointed to the active me- 
dical staff of Memorial Hospital of 
Martinsville and Henry County, 
Virginia. 

Ralph L. Thompson (B.S. ac- 
counting) has been named senior 
vice-president by the Bank of Vir- 
ginia. 

1971 

David Bott (B.A. history) has 
been promoted from vice-presi- 
dent to senior vice-president by 
Needham, Harper, and Steers, 
Inc., a New York-based advertis- 
ing agency. He has worked with 
the agency since 1978. 

K. Norman Campbell (B.S. 
management) has been appointed 
vice-president by the First Vir- 
ginia Bank — Northern Neck. 

Catherine V. Cauthorne (B.S. 
nursing) is a member of faculty of 
the School of Nursing at Norfolk 
General Hospital in Norfolk, Vir- 
ginia. She is completing her mas- 
ter's degree in psychology at Old 
Dominion University, also in Nor- 
folk. 

John E. Farrell (B.S. economics) 
has been named sales director for 
Brenco, Inc. of Petersburg, Vir- 
ginia. 

J. Douglas Gardner (AS. coop- 
erative distribution, B.S. advertis- 
ing) has been named manager of 
graphic services by Virginia Paper 
Company in Richmond. 

Michael K. Kelly (B.S. business 
administration) has been pro- 
moted from assistant cashier to 
assistant vice-president by First 
and Merchants National Bank. 

Nancy A. Krause (B.S. account- 
ing) has been promoted to tax 
manager in the tax department of 
A. H. Robins Company in Rich- 
mond. 

Frank A. Sherman, III, (B.A. 
English) has published his first 



book of poetry titled Pancakes at 
Four. 

Robert W. Waldren (B.S. adver- 
tising) is local sales manager for 
radio station WRVQ in Rich- 
mond. 

Curry Wertz (B.S. history and 
social science education) has been 
named soccer coach at Cave 
Spring High School in Roanoke, 
Virginia. 

1972 

James T. Davis, Jr., (B.S. busi- 
ness administration and manage- 
ment) has been promoted from 
assistant vice-president to vice- 
president by Capitoline Invest- 
ment Services, Inc. 

Deborah Englebrecht (B.F.A. 
fashion design) has been pro- 
moted to casualty consultant for 
Prudential Property and Casualty 
Insurance Company's field claim 
office in Holmdel, New Jersey. 

Ann Kelly King (B.S. nursing, 
M.S. nursing 1977) is a clinical 
nurse specialist in enterostomal 
therapy at VCU's Medical College 
of Virginia Hospitals. 

Bartholomew D. Myles 
(M.H.A.) is serving as a member 
of the Tidewater Hospital Coun- 
cil. 

1973 

Brenda Adkins (B.S. rehabilita- 
tion counseling) received the 1981 
Outstanding Service Award from 
the Virginia Department of Reha- 
bilitative Services. 

Dave L. Bernd (M.H.A.) is 
serving as a member of the Tide- 
water Hospital Council. 

William R. Britton, Jr., (B.S. 
recreation leadership) has been 
elected Region 1 vice-president by 
the Virginia Civil Defense Associ- 
ation. He is emergency services 
coordinator for Appomattox 
County and town manager of Ap- 
pomattox. 



29 



Alumni Update 



Moving? 

Please notify us of your change of address 



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OLD ADDRESS 



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City 


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NEW ADDRESS 


Zip Code 


Name 


Address 


City 



State Zip Code 

Send to: 

Alumni Records Officer 
Virginia Commonwealth University 
Richmond, VA 23284 
(804) 257-1228 

Important note: If this magazine is 
addressed to an alumnus who no 
longer lives at the address printed 
on the address label, please advise 
us so that we can correct our re- 
cords. If you know the person's 
correct address, we would appreci- 
ate that information. Also, if a 
husband and wife are receiving 
more than one copy of the maga- 
zine, we would like to know so 
that we can avoid duplicate mail- 
ings. Please provide the names of 
both individuals plus the wife's 
maiden name, if appropriate. 



Errett H. Callahan, Jr., (M.F.A. 
painting and printmaking) and 
his v^ife Linda A. Callahan (B.S. 
special education 1977) recently 
completed seven months' work 
with the second international 
work seminar in lithic technology 
in Lejre, Denmark. They will con- 
duct a lecture tour across the 
country this summer. 

Sandra G. Holland (B.S. jour- 
nalism) is listed in several na- 
tional and international biogra- 
phies including The Directory of 
Distinguished Americans, The World 
Who's Who of Women, and The 
Who's Who of American Women. She 
is a film representative in south- 
ern Texas for a Christian mission- 
ary organization. 

W. R. Johnston, Jr., (B.S. history 
and social science education) has 
been named director of recreation 
by the town of Pearisburg, Vir- 
ginia. 

Kenneth R. Klinger (B.S. busi- 
ness administration) has been 
named assistant vice-president by 
the Bank of Virginia. 

Janet H. Makela (B.S. elemen- 
tary education) is employed as a 
teacher by the Virginia Beach, Vir- 
ginia, school system. 

Ruth Robertson (B.F.A. art ed- 
ucation) and a partner have de- 
signed an innovative variety of 
floor covering — canvas floor- 
cloths. Robertson is part owner of 
Colonial Creations, Inc., in Hern- 
don, Virginia, where the floor- 
cloths are produced. 

Richard T. Ward (B.S. advertis- 
ing) is owner and operator of 
Lindsey Ward, Inc., an electronics 
store in Knoxville, Tennessee. 

1974 

Marjorie Bendl (B.S. mass com- 
munications) has graduated from 
T. C. Williams Law School in 
Richmond and is now in private 
practice. 

Helen M. Davidson (B.S. soci- 
ology) is pursuing a music degree 
at Hollins College. 



Janet R. Driscoll (B.F.A. com- 
munication arts and design) is 
working as a designer for Elec- 
tronic Education, a publication of 
Electronic Communications, Inc. 
of Tallahassee, Florida. 

Douglas S. Higgins, III, 
(B.F.A. painting and printmaking) 
had a collection of drawings and 
paintings displayed in Babcock 
Gallery at Sweet Briar College this 
winter. 

A. Bartlett Keil (B.S. market- 
ing) is a partner in the law firm of 
Poston, Mercer, Mercer, and Keil. 
The firm is located in Norfolk, 
Virginia. 

David Yu (B.S. business admin- 
istration) has joined the First Na- 
tional Bank of Atlanta as a money 
management officer in the bank's 
money management department. 

1975 

Lang Johnston (B.S. account- 
ing) is manager of the computer 
audit assistance group for Coop- 
ers and Lybrand in Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania. 

Pauline A. Mitchell (B.S. mass 
communications) has been named 
chairman of the Public Informa- 
tion Committee of the Advisory 
Board of Visitors of Mary Baldwin 
College in Staunton, Virginia. 

Stephen H. Montgomery 
(M.H.A.) has received the Jay- 
cees' Distinguished Service 
Award for his leadership in the 
1981 United Way campaign in the 
Williamsburg, Virginia, area. He 
is employed by Williamsburg 
Community Hospital as assistant 
administrator. 

Marcus G. Nemuth (B.S. sci- 
ence, M.D. 1981) is serving the 
first year of a four-year residency 
in psychiatry and neurology at 
the University of Washington in 
Seattle. 

Reuben J. Waller, Jr., (B.A., 
history) is working as a real estate 
appraiser with Robert B. Miller 
Associates in Richmond. 



30 



1976 

Joseph V. Boykin, Jr. (M.D.), 
instructor in physiology and resi- 
dent in surgery at VCU, has re- 
ceived the 25th Schering Scholar- 
ship Award from the American 
College of Surgeons. Boykin is 
one of three recipients of the an- 
nual $5,000 award. 

Robert D. Clingenpeel, Jr., 
(M.Ed, guidance and counseling) 
recently completed the final phase 
of a 30-week training program for 
sales representatives with Bur- 
roughs Wellcome Company in Re- 
search Triangle Park, North Caro- 
lina. 

Richard B. Fitzgerald (B.S.W.) 
has received a master's degree in 
religious education from South- 
western Baptist Theological Semi- 
nary in Fort Worth, Texas. 

David Gwaltney (B.F.A. com- 
munication arts and design) is 
now operating his own company, 
Gwaltney Associates, which spe- 
cializes in graphic design and 
marketing communication. He is 
also president of the Virginia 
Beach Anglers Club. 

Carole A. Pratt (D.D.S.) has re- 
ceived the 1981 Virginia Tech Out- 
standing Young Alumna Award in 
recognition of her professional 
and community achievements. 
She is a 1972 graduate of the uni- 
versity with a bachelor's degree in 
biology. 

Ronald C. Puckett (B.F.A. 
crafts) had his woodwork exhib- 
ited at the Lynchburg Fine Arts 
Center this winter. 

Charles R. Richey (M.S.W.) has 
been named director of mental re- 
tardation services in Fishersville, 
Virginia. 

John Alvah Lee Saunders, II, 
(B.S. psychology) has received his 
master of divinity degree from the 
Southern Baptist Theological Sem- 
inary in Louisville, Kentucky. 

Carole G. Traylor (M.S. nurs- 
ing) is head of nursing at the 
Navy Regional Medical Center's 
Adolescent Medicine Clinic in 
Okinawa, Japan. 



1977 

Jean Edwards (M.F.A. painting 
and printmaking) had several of 
her paintings, drawings, and col- 
lages exhibited at Randolph-Ma- 
con College in Ashland, Virginia, 
this winter. She is an artist-in-res- 
idence at the college. 

George H. Flowers, III, 
(M.B.A.) has been elected to the 
board of directors of Consumat 
Systems, Inc. He is a senior staff 
engineer with Virginia Electric 
and Power Company. 

John Hurney (B.F.A. communi- 
cation arts and design) has joined 
New Image, a full-service adver- 
tising agency in Lebanon, New 
Hampshire, as creative director. 

Polly Lazaron (B.F.A. art edu- 
cation) is working as a traveling 
artist with the Virginia Museum 
in Richmond. She is the former 
director of education for the Chil- 
dren's Art Center, Inc. in Norfolk, 
Virginia. 

Vincent A. Manni (B.S. recrea- 
tion) has been hired as a systems 
market coordinator by Brandt, 
Inc., a Wisconsin marketing firm. 

Barbara H. Maricle (B.S. En- 
glish education, M.Ed, adult edu- 
cation 1979) is a self-employed 
training consultant and training 
program designer in the greater 
Richmond area. 

John F. Mowre (M.B.A.) has 
been named manager of business 
planning and analysis by Philip 
Morris. 

Nancy K. Poythress (A.S. gen- 
eral secretarial) has been pro- 
moted to assistant branch man- 
ager of the Bank of West Point in 
Tappahannock, Virginia. 

Marion B. Rowe (B.S. business 
education, M.B.A. 1980) has been 
appointed assistant cashier by 
First Virginia Bank, Northern 
Neck. 

Delores Spahr (B.F.A. interior 
design) recently completed her 
NCIDQ examination in Salt Lake 
City, Utah, and has qualified as a 
professional member of the Amer- 
ican Society of Interior Designers. 



1978 

Suzie Bird (B.F.A. communica- 
tion arts and design) is working 
as art director at Davis and Davis 
Marketing, Inc., a Richmond 
multi-media advertising agency. 

Martin Goldberg (M.D.) has 
been selected for fellowship by 
the American College of Physi- 
cians. 

Marie O. Guasco (M.S. occupa- 
tional therapy) is manager of the 
Department of Occupational 
Therapy at St. Joseph's Hospital 
in Stockton, California. 

M. Caroline Martin (M.H.A.) is 
serving as a member of the Tide- 
water Hospital Council. 

Carol E. Swift (B.S. nursing) 
completed her master's degree in 
nursing at Rush University and is 
now teaching undergraduate and 
graduate courses at the univer- 
sity. 

Wesley F. Vassar, Jr., (B.S. ad- 
ministration of justice and public 
safety, M.P.A. 1979) is a Ph.D. 
candidate in public administration 
at the University of Pittsburgh. 

1979 

Mary N. Blackwood (M.H.A.) 
has been named chief of staff for 
the Virginia Department of Men- 
tal Health and Mental Retarda- 
tion. 

Steven S. Bottorf (B.F.A. com- 
munication arts and design) is 
working in news graphics with 
television station WTTG in Wash- 
ington, D.C. 

Valerie R. Calhoun (B.S. 
French education) is employed by 
the Hanover County School Board 
and is teaching Spanish at Stone- 
wall Jackson Junior High School 
in Mechanicsville, Virginia. 

John P. Crisp (D.D.S.) com- 
pleted training in endodontics at 
the University of North Carolina 
and has opened an endodontics 
practice in Charlottesville, Vir- 
ginia. 



31 



Alumni Update 



Gate Fitt (M.F.A. crafts) is a 
traveling artist with the Virginia 
Museum in Richmond. 

Margaret T. Griffin (B.S. busi- 
ness administration and manage- 
ment) is employed by Philip Mor- 
ris, Inc., as a supervisor in 
finished goods. 

Katherine A. Kelly (B.F.A. 
painting and printmaking) is 
working as a free-lance illustrator 
for the Washington Post and other 
media in Washington, D.C. 

Jon Kuhn (M.F.A. crafts) pre- 
sented a slide show on his work 
as a glassblower as part of the 
Staunton Fine Arts Association's 
Pumphouse Series in Staunton, 
Virginia. 

John H. Muldoon (M.H.A.) has 
been promoted from vice-presi- 
dent to president of the Associa- 
tion of Delaware Hospitals. 

Dennis K. Parrish (B.F.A. the- 
atre) is pursuing a master's degree 
in religious education from South- 
western Baptist Theological Semi- 
nary. 

Robert L. Smith (B.S. account- 
ing) has been promoted to senior 
vice-president and assistant divi- 
sion manager by the Southern 
Products Division of Lydall, Inc. 

John A. Swinger (B.S. business 
administration and management) 
has been named a vice-president 
by Fidelity Bankers Life Insurance 
Company in Richmond. 

Bruce L. Wenner (B.S. special 
education) is employed as a re- 
source teacher by the Bath 
County School System in Bath 
County, Virginia. 

C. Eugene Wilkes (B.S. admin- 
istration of justice and public 
safety) has been promoted to vice- 
president by the Bank of Virginia. 
He is the bank's security officer 
and past president of the Virginia 
Bank Security Association. 

1980 

Irene M. Bality (B.S. business 
administration and management) 
has been appointed vice-president 
for agency administration by Fi- 
delity Bankers Life Insurance 
Company. 

32 



Douglas J. Geib (B.S. business 
administration and management) 
has completed the non-lawyer 
course at the Naval Justice School 
in Newport, Rhode Island. The 
course enables graduates to pro- 
vide paralegal advice and to per- 
form basic legal assistance ser- 
vices. 

Frank J. McNally (M.S. mass 
communications) has been elected 
president of the Old Dominion 
Chapter of the Public Relations 
Society of America. He is em- 
ployed by Continental Telephone 
of Virginia as a community rela- 
tions representative. 

Rick Nelson (M.S.W.) is em- 
ployed as a social worker with 
UPARC in Clearwater, Florida. 

Karen A. Reidy (M.S. rehabili- 
tation counseling) is employed as 
a counselor for deaf and hearing- 
impaired high school age students 
in Ridgewood, New Jersey. 

Sharon A. Sprun (M.S. rehabili- 
tation counseling) has been pro- 
moted to GS-7 by the U.S. Army 
Troop Support Agency at Fort 
Lee, Virginia. She is a manage- 
ment analyst with the directorate 
of resource management at Fort 
Lee. 

1981 

Robert Y. Clayton (M.B.A.) has 
been named an assistant vice- 
president in operations support 
by United Virginia Bank. 

Melanie L. Crouch (B.A. 
French) has joined the Richlands 
News-Press as a news reporter. 
The paper is published in Rich- 
lands, Virginia. 

Ruth M. Elam (B.S. special 
education) is now employed by 
the Cumberland County School 
System and is teaching handi- 
capped preschool children. 

Alan M. Gayle (M.A. eco- 
nomics) has been elected trea- 
surer of the Richmond Associa- 
tion of Business Economists. 

Diane Hill (B.S.W.) has been 
awarded the 1981 Hobart C. Jack- 
son Memorial Fellowship to at- 
tend graduate school at Temple 
University. 



John M. Hohl (B.S. administra- 
tion of justice and public safety) 
has been commissioned as an 
ensign in the Naval Reserve. He 
recently completed ground school 
training at the Naval Aviation 
School in Pensacola, Florida. 

Beverly A. Peacock (M.S.W.) 
has been named crisis counselor 
with the YMCA's Women's Victim 
Advocacy Program in Richmond. 
She is in charge of conducting 
group meetings and is establish- 
ing a format for group sessions at 
the organization's Shelter for Bat- 
tered Women. 

David R. Rogers (B.F.A. crafts) 
had his woodwork exhibited at 
the Lynchburg Fine Arts Center 
this winter. 

Susan H. Rossi (post baccalau- 
reate certificate in accounting) has 
been named manager of budgets 
for A. H. Robins Company in 
Richmond. 



VCU Magazine 

Virginia Commonwealth Univers 
Office of University Publications 
Richmond, VA 23284 



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